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Re: Accessibility Observations

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From: Raleigh Way
Date: Feb 26, 2002 3:43PM


Hi Peter,

You have hit on something I don't know the answer to. I know what to
expect if I design a Web page with columns much like a news paper.
The newer screen readers are capable of reading down each column as
intended. If I use CSS to create a visual layout of "boxed" text,
how does a screen reader handle that? Let me explain a little
further. If I use tables for layout, and I create, say 3 columns of
text on the page, I know that newer SRs (screen readers) can navigate
into and down each column. If I create the same visual layout, i.e.,
"columns" using CSS, do the new screen readers treat the CSS boxes
the same? I haven't tested this yet.

Thanks for your input,

Raleigh

> > The answer I keep coming back to is
>> linearity. I've surfed a lot of sites designed for people with
>> disabilities, e.g., schools for the blind, and the one thing that I
>> notice is that the sites are linear. By linear design, I mean
>> left-to-right layout of text to accommodate older screen readers.
>
>You do realise you can use CSS to have linear design for screen readers and
>all the boxes you like for visual browsers right?
>Peter
>
>
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