WebAIM - Web Accessibility In Mind

Web Accessibility for Designers

The focus of web accessibility is often on web development – the things that happen in HTML, CSS, or JavaScript. Optimal accessibility should start much earlier, as part of the visual design process. This infographic highlights many important principles of accessible design.

Infographic

Web Accessibility for Designers infographic with text description below

Text Version

Plan Heading Structure Early

Ensure all content and design fits into a logical heading structure.

Ensure Logical Reading Order

The reading order for screen reader users should align with the visual order.

Provide Good Contrast

Be especially careful with shades of orange, yellow, and light gray. Check your contrast levels with our color contrast checker.

Use True Text Instead of Images of Text

True text enlarges better, loads faster, and is easier to translate and customize.

Use Adequate Font Size

Small text is difficult for all users to see. Ensure text is optimally readable.

Remember Line Length

Don’t make lines too long or too short.

Make Sure Links are Recognizable

Distinguish links from body text using more than just color (e.g., underline).

Design Keyboard Focus Indicators

When navigating with the keyboard, the focused item must be visually distinctive.

Design a "Skip to Main Content" Link

A keyboard accessible link for users to skip navigation should be at the top of the page.

Ensure Link Text Makes Sense on Its Own

Avoid "Click Here" or other ambiguous link textsuch as "More" or “"Continue".

Design Usable Widgets and Controls

Dialogs, tooltips, menus, carousels, etc. must be easy to use and accessible.

Use Animation, Video, and Audio Carefully

Provide play/pause buttons. Avoid distracting movement.

Don’t Convey Content Using Only Color

Users may override or may not be able to see differences between colors.

Design Accessible Form Controls

Ensure form controls have descriptive labels, instructions, and error messages.

Embed Code