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Re: Tags to Represent Questions

for

From: Andy Mabbett
Date: Jan 11, 2008 2:40PM


In message < <EMAIL REMOVED> >, Keith
Parks < <EMAIL REMOVED> > writes

>
>On Jan 10, 2008, at 11:26 AM, Andy Mabbett wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> uses the "id" attribute semantically, and could equally apply to other
>> elements. You could also add class attributes of "question" and
>> "answer", too; and add a class of "FAQ" to the DL.
>
>But how does that relate to accessibility?
>
>Aren't IDs and Classes part of the "presentation" (css), and separate
>from the "content" (html)?

No; they're HTML and thus content; more precisely content-labels; and
identify which content is which, so that the styles can be applied to
it.

See also:

<http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/global.html#h-7.5.2>;

7.5.2 Element identifiers: the id and class attributes

Attribute definitions

id = name [CS]

This attribute assigns a name to an element. This name
must be unique in a document.

class = cdata-list [CS]

This attribute assigns a class name or set of class
names to an element. Any number of elements may be
assigned the same class name or names. Multiple class
names must be separated by white space characters.

The id attribute assigns a unique identifier to an element
(which may be verified by an SGML parser). For example, the
following paragraphs are distinguished by their id values:

The id attribute has several roles in HTML:

* As a style sheet selector.

* As a target anchor for hypertext links.

* As a means to reference a particular element from a
script.

* As the name of a declared OBJECT element.

* For general purpose processing by user agents (e.g. for
identifying fields when extracting data from HTML pages
into a database, translating HTML documents into other
formats, etc.).

The class attribute, on the other hand, assigns one or more
class names to an element; the element may be said to belong to
these classes. A class name may be shared by several element
instances. The class attribute has several roles in HTML:

* As a style sheet selector (when an author wishes to
assign style information to a set of elements).

* For general purpose processing by user agents.


--
Andy Mabbett
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