E-mail List Archives

Re: JAWS Accordion test

for

From: Al Sparber
Date: Mar 23, 2009 12:15PM


Thanks. After testing with JAWS for several days, that's what I thought. The
main focus of our experiment was to provide an accordion system that could
be read in any scenario with minimum confusion. That is, in "Say All" mode
and by using navigation keys. A key criteria was that a user could hear the
hidden content, by using navigation keys, whether or not the same page
anchor link was executed. The test, of course, was assuming a content-only
accordion.


From: "Steve Green" < <EMAIL REMOVED> >


> In my experience they read one line at a time, although they may use other
> strategies in addition, such as using the links list, heading list or
> jumping to headings.
>
> 'SayAll' mode, which is the mode where JAWS reads continuously, is not
> particularly useful for most tasks because the semantic structure is not
> read out in this mode and it is impossible to build a mental model of the
> page. It is really only useful for reading large blocks of text, but even
> then I have not seen anyone use it.
>
> To a large extent I expect it depends how the user was trained, and maybe
> someone who has not received any training may tend to use it more because
> JAWS switches to SayAll mode each time a new page loads.