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Re: accessibility of accessibility checking tools

for

From: Olaf Drümmer
Date: Dec 23, 2015 4:46PM


Hi Lucy,

from my personal experience and point of view the underlying issue is somehow reciprocal. As much as various tools that help establish or improve accessibility of content tend to not be accessible, for example assistive technology tends not to be accessible to those who do not have to rely on it. It took me personally a long time to begin to understand what it means (in the broadest sense) for someone to have to rely on content being accessible and on using assistive technology to actually access it and interact with it. Let’s take a screen reader for example. One can get JAWS free of charge to play with, NVDA and VoiceOver are free. Nonetheless, they unsurprisingly target vision impaired users (nothing wrong with that), and require some training before they can be useful. But there is no guidance for non-disabled users to quickly at least get to the core features/functionality of the AT. What would be extremely useful are features that help a sighted user to understand what’s going on while using AT (e.g. by highlighting on screen what is currently being presented by text to speech or the Braille display).

Just an idea what to add to the list of observations/topics to take into account.

Olaf



> On 22.12.2015, at 20:55, Lucy Greco < <EMAIL REMOVED> > wrote:
>
> hello:
> this is a vary in portent problem we are facing today we need to have
> access to the tools our peers use to test as blind access professionals.
> we are holding a meeting at CSUN on Thursday morning at 10 about this vary
> topic. a few other blind professionals and my self are wanting to start
> a community that can share tools tips and tricks for other blind users.
> the listing for the event is called strike of the bats. and will be led by
> my self and Birkir Gunnarsson this meeting will be to talk about how best
> to share information and start creating a library of tools and lessons
> for blind professionals to use in there #a11y work. Lucy
>
> On Tue, Dec 22, 2015 at 12:43 AM, Shadi Abou-Zahra < <EMAIL REMOVED> > wrote:
>
>> Hello,
>>
>> W3C/WAI maintains a list of web accessibility evaluation tools:
>> - http://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/
>>
>> Some tool vendors provide information about the accessibility of their
>> tools. You can find these tools -- currently only 6 tools -- by using the
>> filter option "Tools providing accessibility information" at the very end
>> of the filter options list.
>>
>> Use the "Add your tool" button to provide information about tools that you
>> know about -- as a tool user or tool vendor.
>>
>> Best,
>> Shadi
>>
>>
>>
>> On 22.12.2015 06:27, sucharu wrote:
>>
>>> Hey All,
>>>
>>> Good morning!
>>>
>>> I want to learn about
>>>
>>> 1. Available accessibility evaluating tools accessible for screen
>>> reader users.
>>>
>>> 2. Is there any work around to make "inspect element" accessible.
>>>
>>> 3. Is there some free tool that can check whole website at one go.
>>>
>>> 4. Looking for reply.
>>>
>>> 5. Thanks,
>>>
>>> 6. Sucharu
>>>
>>> >>> >>> >>> >>>
>>>
>> --
>> Shadi Abou-Zahra - http://www.w3.org/People/shadi/
>> Activity Lead, WAI International Program Office
>> W3C Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)
>>
>> >> >> >> >>
>
>
>
> --
> Lucia Greco
> Web Accessibility Evangelist
> IST - Architecture, Platforms, and Integration
> University of California, Berkeley
> (510) 289-6008 skype: lucia1-greco
> http://webaccess.berkeley.edu
> Follow me on twitter @accessaces
> > > >