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Re: accessible documents and translation

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From: Shawn Henry
Date: Mar 30, 2010 4:24PM


> I increasingly see the assertion that accessible web pages and pdfs tend to translate better than less accessible versions.... Is there a source for this idea or is it an urban myth?


Hi James,

Several things that make web pages accessible also make them easier to translate. Here is just one example:
"[Accessible web pages] Reduce redesign and translation time and skills needed by using standard markup and style sheets to style and format text, instead of using bitmap images of text or math.
Site designers often use bitmap images for stylized text. In such cases, to change or translate text content or style, each image has to be manipulated. If instead the text was not in an image and the style was provided in a style sheet, then the text can be easily changed or translated. To change the design is a simple style sheet change instead of restyling images of text. (WCAG 2.0 success criteria 1.4.5, 1.4.9; WCAG 1.0 checkpoint 3.1)"
From "Technical Factors in Developing a Web Accessibility Business Case for Your Organization" - http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/tech

Best,
~Shawn


-----
Shawn Lawton Henry
W3C Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)
e-mail: <EMAIL REMOVED>
phone: +1.617.395.7664
about: http://www.w3.org/People/Shawn/



James Bailey wrote:
> Hello All,
> I increasingly see the assertion that accessible web pages and pdfs tend to translate better than less accessible versions. It makes sense since such documents should be better structured. Is there a source for this idea or is it an urban myth?
>
> Thanks,
>
> James
>
> --
> James Bailey
> Adaptive Technology Access Adviser, University of Oregon
> 1501 Kincaid St.
> Eugene, OR 97403-1299
> Office: 541-346-1076
> <EMAIL REMOVED>
>
>