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RE: Testing current accessibility of an entire University

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From: Glenda Watson Hyatt
Date: Sep 26, 2002 11:33AM


This is a very timely thread. I'm waiting to hear on a contract that would
involve making a provincial government's website accessible within four
months.

I'm thinking the process should be something like:
- do a sample audit, hopefully there are templates involves, but also look
at the content, to discover where the problems are
- revise the internal Internet policies to reflect current web accessibility
standards
- develop a plan to implement new policy, perhaps prioritize the changes and
start with the top ten percent more commonly visited pages and then work
down from there
- and do informal accessibility training along the way to bring everyone
onboard

Anything I missed? Any other suggestions?

Didn't WAI have something on how to write an Implementation plan? Couldn't
find it last night.


Thanks,
Glenda

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Glenda Watson Hyatt
Soaring Eagle Communications
"Creating freedom and power through accessible communications"
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Website: http://www.eaglecom.bc.ca
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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Steve Vosloo [mailto: <EMAIL REMOVED> ]
> Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2002 7:29 AM
> To: <EMAIL REMOVED>
> Subject: RE: Testing current accessibility of an entire University
>
>
> I recently audited a 26 000 page site -- but only looked at 10 key
> templates. We decided that it was best to pick a few templates that held
> elements of the entire site, e.g. if Flash was used then one of the
> templates audited would be a standard Flash page, and audit those pages
> thoroughly (manual and automated testing). This then gives you an idea
> of what the main issues are -- my audit report was broken down by WCAG
> priority levels so it was easy for the client to make an informed
> decision about which priority to adopt (given the budget and time
> considerations). The task of retrofitting a large site can be divided
> into template level and content level issues. Template level issues,
> e.g. the ALT description of the ubiquitous Search button, are relatively
> easy to fix (sometimes very easy), whereas content level issues, e.g.
> ALT descriptions of academic diagrams, potentially require someone to
> manually check every page ... A mammoth task.
>
> Conducting an initial audit on a limited number of pages can also assist
> you in creating a rollout plan, prioritising certain sections of the
> site for retrofitting first.
>
> Steve
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Diana Ratliff [mailto: <EMAIL REMOVED> ]
> Sent: 26 September 2002 02:46 PM
> To: <EMAIL REMOVED>
> Subject: Testing current accessibility of an entire University
>
>
> Hello! Short of spending months running every single page through BOBBY
> or
> something, does anyone have any ideas on how to see how accessible a
> huge
> website currently is? For benchmarking purposes? Would also like
> RECENT
> data on general accessibility of universities as a backup document.
> Thank
> you!
>
> Diana Ratliff
>
>
>
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