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From: Krack, Joseph@DOR
Date: Sep 25, 2014 11:07AM


When on a travel site and a map appears with several 'pins' in it
representing hotel options. When clicking on one of the pins and a pop
up appears with the hotel name and address, should the hotel name and
address be automatically read by a screen reader? Right now there is
nothing and I must use the down arrow to begin hearing the content.

Is there a WCAG code (3.2.2 perhaps?) that covers this?

Thanks!
Joe

-----Original Message-----
From: <EMAIL REMOVED>
[mailto: <EMAIL REMOVED> ] On Behalf Of Nancy Johnson
Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 12:08 PM
To: WebAIM Discussion List
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] One list item in a list

Many sites are dynamic and the original designers or developers have no
control over whether a list is 0 or more.

A content person, which adds content to the list items, may or may not
know what a list item is or that screen readers exist let alone how it
reads content. They update content via an Admin Control Panel and
depending on the quality of the Rich Text Editor, will depend on the
continued quality of the code. As sites get older, the HTML often
degrades.

Nancy

On Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 8:25 AM, John Hicks < <EMAIL REMOVED> >
wrote:
> ... bringing up the rear of the conversation...
>
> One of the things you see a lot on poorly made corporate websites is
> the list made up of one item lists.
>
> This is covered in your blog under the "Do not use HTML list for
> styles such as indenting"
>
>
> In these cases the collection of lists really needs to be a list, but
> screen readers will only see 5 lists (say), each of one element.
Crazy
>
>
>
>
>
> 2014-09-23 20:38 GMT+02:00 Rakesh P < <EMAIL REMOVED> >:
>
>> Thanks all for your inputs. I have published the article on my blog
>> at http://www.maxability.co.in/2014/09/html-lists-accessibility/
>>
>> Thanks & Regards
>> Rakesh
>> On 9/20/14, Hans Hillen < <EMAIL REMOVED> > wrote:
>> > A one-item list or even a no-item lists conveys to the user that
>> > this is
>> a
>> > structure capable of containing a group of items. It lets the user
>> > know that at any other time there may be more items there and the
>> > content is enumerabe. Like Jared said: if you have a list, say a
>> > to-do list, and
>> you
>> > check off items until you get to the last item, that doesn't mean
>> > it
>> stops
>> > becoming a list.
>> >
>> > On Sat, Sep 20, 2014 at 7:53 AM, Mallory van Achterberg <
>> > <EMAIL REMOVED> > wrote:
>> >
>> >> On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 12:20:25PM -0600, Jared Smith wrote:
>> >> > Rakesh wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> > > I was so far of the thought that a HTML list should contain
>> >> > > more
>> than
>> >> > > 2 list items.
>> >> >
>> >> > My wife and I share a shopping list and I pick up the groceries
>> >> > on the way home from work. It currently has one item - lettuce.
>> >> > Yet it's still a shopping list.
>> >> >
>> >> > I admit it is a bit atypical for a list to only have one item -
>> >> > and there is overhead that should be considered for developers,
>> >> > sighted users, and screen reader users when encountering a list
>> >> > with one item (and for me when stopping at the grocer for only
>> >> > lettuce) - but there's nothing that prohibits this.
>> >>
>> >> I have lists on our e-commerce platforms where there may only be
>> >> one item available until a user logs in. Since it's a list of
>> >> things users can do regarding a product, they do belong in the
>> >> same list, but some options only make sense for users who are also
logged in.
>> >>
>> >> _mallory
>> >> >> >> >> >> list messages to <EMAIL REMOVED>
>> >>
>> > >> > >> > list messages to <EMAIL REMOVED>
>> >
>> >> >> list messages to <EMAIL REMOVED>
>>
> > > list messages to <EMAIL REMOVED>
messages to <EMAIL REMOVED>