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Re: looking forhtmltechniqueto provide a methodto skiprepetitive navigation linksi

for

From: smithj7
Date: Oct 13, 2006 12:40AM


Patrick,
You brought up a good point when you asked:
"And is it part of the remit of organisations such as RNIB to help promote
user education and make their customers and stakeholders aware of the tools
that are available for them and how they can benefit from them?"
I work for the RNIB of Florida. We have one monthly newsletter that focuses
on tips for users of access technology, but it is often very short. Iowa
Blind Services was purchasing on-line tutorials, and had so many users that
they had to limit it to people with passwords so their are people that would
learn. Please get with me privately and give me some suggestions on how we
can begin starting the teaching process using our website. I'd want to
start with the items that would be most important to users. Once I get a
section of our site started I can usually find employees that will help me
get more information, but getting something started is very difficult.

email <EMAIL REMOVED>

----- Original Message -----
From: "Patrick Lauke" < <EMAIL REMOVED> >
To: "WebAIM Discussion List" < <EMAIL REMOVED> >
Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 6:44 AM
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] looking for htmltechniqueto provide a methodto
skiprepetitive navigation linksi


>> Egan, Bim
>
>> When your viewport is a fraction of the screen, roughly the
>> size of a credit card, it is very useful to be able to have
>> the focus (and viewport) snap to the region of a page that
>> you're interested in. It saves a lot of time panning round
>> for the required content.
>>
>> On this basis I'd say that skip links should not only be
>> available, but also visible.
>
> But isn't the more sustainable and logical solution for user to use
> the tools/browsers that are most suitable for their particular needs
> (e.g. browsers like Opera with useful commands and keyboard shortcuts etc)
> and to learn how to use them properly? Where does user education
> come into play here? And is it part of the remit of organisations such
> as RNIB to help promote user education and make their customers and
> stakeholders aware of the tools that are available for them and how
> they can benefit from them? And possibly even put pressure on
> tool/browser developers to implement better functionality?
>
> Sorry, this sounds far more antagonistic than it's meant, but as
> Alastair pointed out, it's my hobby horse...
>
> P
> ________________________________
> Patrick H. Lauke
> Web Editor / University of Salford
> http://www.salford.ac.uk
> ________________________________
> Web Standards Project (WaSP) Accessibility Task Force
> http://webstandards.org/
> ________________________________
>
>
>
>