E-mail List Archives

Thread: sample ADA statement for website?

for

Number of posts in this thread: 14 (In chronological order)

From: Mike Warner
Date: Fri, Mar 20 2015 9:17AM
Subject: sample ADA statement for website?
No previous message | Next message →

Hi all,

I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've got
enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's download
link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
We've actually received praise from a couple of students.

Here is our current ADA statement:
MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for learners
with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used assistive
technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of methods
within the course regarding any accessibility issues.

Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?

Thank you,

Mike Warner
Director of IT Services
MindEdge, Inc.

From: Cliff Tyllick
Date: Fri, Mar 20 2015 10:32AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV. Now that the disclaimer is out of the way…

I would change the last sentence. Don't speak about your clients—speak *to* them. Something like:

If you discover an inaccessible feature as you use any of our courses, use the "Contact Us" link to report the problem. Tell us as much as you can:
• what you were trying to do
• how you were trying to do it
• the barrier you encountered
• a method that would be accessible, if you can think of one

And although I haven't seen many places where this is done (perhaps the BBC?), I would love to see tips on how to operate key parts of your site that have custom commands or features not well known to many users. How to control the videos in your particular setting is one possible example.

Given the task and the time, that's how I would do it.

Cliff Tyllick

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Mar 20, 2015, at 10:17 AM, Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've got
> enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's download
> link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
> ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
> complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>
> Here is our current ADA statement:
> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for learners
> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used assistive
> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of methods
> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>
> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>
> Thank you,
>
> Mike Warner
> Director of IT Services
> MindEdge, Inc.
> > >

From: Meacham, Steve - FSA, Kansas City, MO
Date: Fri, Mar 20 2015 11:00AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

I concur. The one I made for our agency, though it's §508 rather than ADA, speaks to the end user/customer/employee: http://www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&;subject=as&topic=landing

-----Original Message-----
From: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Cliff Tyllick
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2015 11:33 AM
To: WebAIM Discussion List
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] sample ADA statement for website?

I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV. Now that the disclaimer is out of the way…

I would change the last sentence. Don't speak about your clients—speak *to* them. Something like:

If you discover an inaccessible feature as you use any of our courses, use the "Contact Us" link to report the problem. Tell us as much as you can:
• what you were trying to do
• how you were trying to do it
• the barrier you encountered
• a method that would be accessible, if you can think of one

And although I haven't seen many places where this is done (perhaps the BBC?), I would love to see tips on how to operate key parts of your site that have custom commands or features not well known to many users. How to control the videos in your particular setting is one possible example.

Given the task and the time, that's how I would do it.

Cliff Tyllick

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Mar 20, 2015, at 10:17 AM, Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've
> got enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's
> download link is broken. We test every new course and feature first
> using JAWS ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We
> haven't had any complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>
> Here is our current ADA statement:
> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
> learners with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with
> Disabilities Act
> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used
> assistive technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a
> variety of methods within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>
> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>
> Thank you,
>
> Mike Warner
> Director of IT Services
> MindEdge, Inc.
> > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

From: Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum
Date: Fri, Mar 20 2015 2:59PM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that paragraph
with contact instructions:

Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS and
courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .

Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm working on a
VPAT now to link to from that same page.

Mike Warner
Director of IT Services
MindEdge, Inc.

2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:

> Hi all,
>
> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've got
> enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's download
> link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
> ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
> complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>
> Here is our current ADA statement:
> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for learners
> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used assistive
> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of methods
> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>
> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>
> Thank you,
>
> Mike Warner
> Director of IT Services
> MindEdge, Inc.
>

From: Cliff Tyllick
Date: Sat, Mar 21 2015 12:27PM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi, Mike!

Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is that your statement will more favorably impress more people if you take a few minutes to review it using the principles of plain language.

In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good friend. You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how complaints can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call me."

Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in that direct, active voice.

Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their frustration with the experience will still be able to get your message quickly.

And because this more personal approach makes the point that you added this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a barrier.

In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems to be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate risk, so they made us put it here."

I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come across that way?

Cliff Tyllick

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that paragraph
> with contact instructions:
>
> Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS and
> courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
>
> Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm working on a
> VPAT now to link to from that same page.
>
> Mike Warner
> Director of IT Services
> MindEdge, Inc.
>
> 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've got
>> enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's download
>> link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
>> ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
>> complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
>> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>>
>> Here is our current ADA statement:
>> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for learners
>> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
>> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
>> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
>> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used assistive
>> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of methods
>> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>>
>> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>>
>> Thank you,
>>
>> Mike Warner
>> Director of IT Services
>> MindEdge, Inc.
> > >

From: Whitney Quesenbery
Date: Sun, Mar 22 2015 5:29AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Cheers to Cliff for bringing up the style and tone of the conversation and
how important plain language is for so many people.

The principles for accessible UX (from A Web for Everyone) on this topic
are:

Plain Language: Creates a conversation:
People can read, understand, and use the information.

- Write for your audience.
- Follow plain language guidelines for writing content.
- Write sentences and paragraphs for easy scanning.
- Support users through their tasks.
- Structure the whole page for scanning and comprehension.
- Write helpful links.
- Use language your audience is familiar with, or provide definitions.
- Provide plain language summaries of complex content.
- Don’t rely on readability formulas.
- Usability test your content.

I've done a number of presentations on the topic, including at CSUN and the
Accessibility Summit. They tend to be tailored for the audience, so content
examples differ, but this presentation has the basics.
http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/content-for-everyone-20599326

And, I'm teaching sessions on accessible content, plain language and
writing great alt text at AccessU this May, along with a great lineup of
instructors: http://www.knowbility.org/v/john-slatin-accessu/





On Sat, Mar 21, 2015 at 2:27 PM Cliff Tyllick via WebAIM-Forum <
= EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Hi, Mike!
>
> Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately
> available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is that
> your statement will more favorably impress more people if you take a few
> minutes to review it using the principles of plain language.
>
> In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good friend.
> You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how complaints
> can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call me."
>
> Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in that
> direct, active voice.
>
> Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their
> frustration with the experience will still be able to get your message
> quickly.
>
> And because this more personal approach makes the point that you added
> this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a
> barrier.
>
> In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems to
> be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate risk, so they
> made us put it here."
>
> I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come
> across that way?
>
> Cliff Tyllick
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its
> fault.
>
> > On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum <
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
> >
> > Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that paragraph
> > with contact instructions:
> >
> > Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS and
> > courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
> >
> > Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm working on a
> > VPAT now to link to from that same page.
> >
> > Mike Warner
> > Director of IT Services
> > MindEdge, Inc.
> >
> > 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
> >
> >> Hi all,
> >>
> >> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've got
> >> enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's download
> >> link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
> >> ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
> >> complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
> >> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
> >>
> >> Here is our current ADA statement:
> >> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
> learners
> >> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
> >> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
> >> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
> >> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used
> assistive
> >> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of
> methods
> >> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
> >>
> >> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
> >>
> >> Thank you,
> >>
> >> Mike Warner
> >> Director of IT Services
> >> MindEdge, Inc.
> > > > > > > > > >

From: Dr Jonathan Hassell
Date: Mon, Mar 23 2015 2:20AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Spot on, Steve!

Again, I'm not a lawyer, but we had a great lawyer on our team who advised us when we created the advice on creating accessibility statements in the British Standards for Web Accessibility, BS 8878.

The main thing, from our perspective, was to work out who the accessibility statement is for, and why would they bother reading it.

Find my summary of that advice at: http://www.hassellinclusion.com/2012/05/write-accessibility-statement/

Best regards

Jonathan

--

Prof Jonathan Hassell
Director, Hassell Inclusion

Author of the book "Including your missing 20% by embedding web and mobile accessibility" - available now on amazon

Blog: http://hassellinclusion.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/jonhassell

----

From: "Meacham, Steve - FSA, Kansas City, MO" < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] sample ADA statement for website?
Date: 20 March 2015 17:00:12 GMT
To: WebAIM Discussion List < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
Reply-To: WebAIM Discussion List < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >


I concur. The one I made for our agency, though it's §508 rather than ADA, speaks to the end user/customer/employee:http://www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&;subject=as&topic=landing

-----Original Message-----
From: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Cliff Tyllick
Sent: Friday, March 20, 2015 11:33 AM
To: WebAIM Discussion List
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] sample ADA statement for website?

I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV. Now that the disclaimer is out of the way…

I would change the last sentence. Don't speak about your clients—speak *to* them. Something like:

If you discover an inaccessible feature as you use any of our courses, use the "Contact Us" link to report the problem. Tell us as much as you can:
• what you were trying to do
• how you were trying to do it
• the barrier you encountered
• a method that would be accessible, if you can think of one

And although I haven't seen many places where this is done (perhaps the BBC?), I would love to see tips on how to operate key parts of your site that have custom commands or features not well known to many users. How to control the videos in your particular setting is one possible example.

Given the task and the time, that's how I would do it.

Cliff Tyllick

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Mar 20, 2015, at 10:17 AM, Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've
> got enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's
> download link is broken. We test every new course and feature first
> using JAWS ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We
> haven't had any complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>
> Here is our current ADA statement:
> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
> learners with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with
> Disabilities Act
> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used
> assistive technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a
> variety of methods within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>
> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>
> Thank you,
>
> Mike Warner
> Director of IT Services
> MindEdge, Inc.
> > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

From: Cliff Tyllick
Date: Mon, Mar 23 2015 12:13PM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Perfect, Jonathan! I will add that post to my bookmarks so I can get back to work faster the next time a colleague asks. I'll e-mail them this link and ask for them to get back to me if they still need help after they've read it.

Cliff

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Mar 23, 2015, at 3:20 AM, Dr Jonathan Hassell via WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Tyllick
>
> Sent from my iPhone

From: Clark, Michelle - NRCS, Washington, DC
Date: Tue, Mar 24 2015 7:48AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi Whitney,

I am a little confused. With the problems that is known about scanned documents and what they can give users of assistive technology, I do not understand why there is a reference to using scanned document in your statement below. Please give me clarification. Is it assumed the user would use OCR?

Thank You,
Michelle Clark
Information Technology Specialist
Section 508 Coordinator
Office of the Chief Information Officer
USDA / Natural Resources Conservation Service
1400 Independence Ave. SW.
Rm. 1669-S
Washington, DC. 20250

O: 202 2609014
E-mail: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
To learn more about Section 508, go to www.section508.gov.

“The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.”
― Barack Obama


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Whitney Quesenbery via WebAIM-Forum
Sent: Sunday, March 22, 2015 7:29 AM
To: Cliff Tyllick; WebAIM Discussion List; Mike Warner
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] sample ADA statement for website?

Cheers to Cliff for bringing up the style and tone of the conversation and how important plain language is for so many people.

The principles for accessible UX (from A Web for Everyone) on this topic
are:

Plain Language: Creates a conversation:
People can read, understand, and use the information.

- Write for your audience.
- Follow plain language guidelines for writing content.
- Write sentences and paragraphs for easy scanning.
- Support users through their tasks.
- Structure the whole page for scanning and comprehension.
- Write helpful links.
- Use language your audience is familiar with, or provide definitions.
- Provide plain language summaries of complex content.
- Don’t rely on readability formulas.
- Usability test your content.

I've done a number of presentations on the topic, including at CSUN and the Accessibility Summit. They tend to be tailored for the audience, so content examples differ, but this presentation has the basics.
http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/content-for-everyone-20599326

And, I'm teaching sessions on accessible content, plain language and writing great alt text at AccessU this May, along with a great lineup of
instructors: http://www.knowbility.org/v/john-slatin-accessu/





On Sat, Mar 21, 2015 at 2:27 PM Cliff Tyllick via WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Hi, Mike!
>
> Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately
> available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is
> that your statement will more favorably impress more people if you
> take a few minutes to review it using the principles of plain language.
>
> In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good friend.
> You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how
> complaints can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call me."
>
> Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in
> that direct, active voice.
>
> Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their
> frustration with the experience will still be able to get your message
> quickly.
>
> And because this more personal approach makes the point that you added
> this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a
> barrier.
>
> In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems
> to be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate risk,
> so they made us put it here."
>
> I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come
> across that way?
>
> Cliff Tyllick
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are
> its fault.
>
> > On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum <
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
> >
> > Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that
> > paragraph with contact instructions:
> >
> > Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS
> > and courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
> >
> > Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm working
> > on a VPAT now to link to from that same page.
> >
> > Mike Warner
> > Director of IT Services
> > MindEdge, Inc.
> >
> > 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
> >
> >> Hi all,
> >>
> >> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've
> >> got enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's
> >> download link is broken. We test every new course and feature
> >> first using JAWS ourselves, then we have a blind consultant
> >> re-test. We haven't had any complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
> >> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
> >>
> >> Here is our current ADA statement:
> >> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
> learners
> >> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with
> >> Disabilities Act
> >> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have
> >> accessibility experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and
> >> new features for learner experience and compatibility with the most
> >> commonly used
> assistive
> >> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of
> methods
> >> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
> >>
> >> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
> >>
> >> Thank you,
> >>
> >> Mike Warner
> >> Director of IT Services
> >> MindEdge, Inc.
> > > > > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
> > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>

From: David Farough
Date: Tue, Mar 24 2015 8:06AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi Michelle:

I think perhaps in this case Whitney was referring to how a user with
vision scans or reads the page. Many factors can effect a persons
ability to comprehend or understand content that is presented.

David Farough
(819) 420-8418



>>> "Clark, Michelle - NRCS, Washington, DC"
< = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > 09:48 AM Tuesday, March 24, 2015 >>>
Hi Whitney,

I am a little confused. With the problems that is known about scanned
documents and what they can give users of assistive technology, I do
not understand why there is a reference to using scanned document in
your statement below. Please give me clarification. Is it assumed the
user would use OCR?

Thank You,
Michelle Clark
Information Technology Specialist
Section 508 Coordinator
Office of the Chief Information Officer
USDA / Natural Resources Conservation Service
1400 Independence Ave. SW.
Rm. 1669-S
Washington, DC. 20250

O: 202 2609014
E-mail: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
To learn more about Section 508, go to www.section508.gov.

“The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something.
Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make
some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will
fill yourself with hope.”
― Barack Obama


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On
Behalf Of Whitney Quesenbery via WebAIM-Forum
Sent: Sunday, March 22, 2015 7:29 AM
To: Cliff Tyllick; WebAIM Discussion List; Mike Warner
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] sample ADA statement for website?

Cheers to Cliff for bringing up the style and tone of the conversation
and how important plain language is for so many people.

The principles for accessible UX (from A Web for Everyone) on this
topic
are:

Plain Language: Creates a conversation:
People can read, understand, and use the information.

- Write for your audience.
- Follow plain language guidelines for writing content.
- Write sentences and paragraphs for easy scanning.
- Support users through their tasks.
- Structure the whole page for scanning and comprehension.
- Write helpful links.
- Use language your audience is familiar with, or provide definitions.
- Provide plain language summaries of complex content.
- Don’t rely on readability formulas.
- Usability test your content.

I've done a number of presentations on the topic, including at CSUN and
the Accessibility Summit. They tend to be tailored for the audience, so
content examples differ, but this presentation has the basics.
http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/content-for-everyone-20599326

And, I'm teaching sessions on accessible content, plain language and
writing great alt text at AccessU this May, along with a great lineup
of
instructors: http://www.knowbility.org/v/john-slatin-accessu/





On Sat, Mar 21, 2015 at 2:27 PM Cliff Tyllick via WebAIM-Forum <
= EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Hi, Mike!
>
> Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately

> available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is
> that your statement will more favorably impress more people if you
> take a few minutes to review it using the principles of plain
language.
>
> In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good
friend.
> You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how
> complaints can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call
me."
>
> Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in

> that direct, active voice.
>
> Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their
> frustration with the experience will still be able to get your
message
> quickly.
>
> And because this more personal approach makes the point that you
added
> this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a

> barrier.
>
> In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems

> to be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate
risk,
> so they made us put it here."
>
> I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come

> across that way?
>
> Cliff Tyllick
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages
are
> its fault.
>
> > On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum <
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
> >
> > Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that
> > paragraph with contact instructions:
> >
> > Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS

> > and courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
> >
> > Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm
working
> > on a VPAT now to link to from that same page.
> >
> > Mike Warner
> > Director of IT Services
> > MindEdge, Inc.
> >
> > 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
> >
> >> Hi all,
> >>
> >> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that
we've
> >> got enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's

> >> download link is broken. We test every new course and feature
> >> first using JAWS ourselves, then we have a blind consultant
> >> re-test. We haven't had any complaints from any of the visually
impaired students we've enrolled.
> >> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
> >>
> >> Here is our current ADA statement:
> >> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
> learners
> >> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with
> >> Disabilities Act
> >> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have
> >> accessibility experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and

> >> new features for learner experience and compatibility with the
most
> >> commonly used
> assistive
> >> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety
of
> methods
> >> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
> >>
> >> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
> >>
> >> Thank you,
> >>
> >> Mike Warner
> >> Director of IT Services
> >> MindEdge, Inc.
> > > > > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
> > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>
messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
Ce courriel est destiné exclusivement au destinataire mentionné en titre
et peut contenir de l'information privilégiée, confidentielle ou
soustraite à la communication aux termes des lois applicables. Toute
divulgation non autorisée, toute reproduction ou réacheminement est
interdit. Si vous n'êtes pas le destinataire de ce courriel, ou n'êtes
pas autorisé par le destinataire visé, ou encore, si vous l'avez reçu
par erreur, veuillez le mentionner immédiatement à l'expéditeur et
supprimer le courriel et les copies.

This e-mail message is intended for the named recipient(s) and may
contain information that is privileged, confidential and/or exempt from
disclosure under applicable law. Unauthorized disclosure, copying or
re-transmission is prohibited. If you are not a named recipient or not
authorized by the named recipient(s), or if you have received this
e-mail in error, then please notify the sender immediately and delete
the message and any copies.

From: Clark, Michelle - NRCS, Washington, DC
Date: Tue, Mar 24 2015 8:17AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

OK. Thanks for the explanation.

Thank You,
Michelle Clark
Information Technology Specialist
Section 508 Coordinator
Office of the Chief Information Officer
USDA / Natural Resources Conservation Service
1400 Independence Ave. SW.
Rm. 1669-S
Washington, DC. 20250

O: 202 2609014
E-mail: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
To learn more about Section 508, go to www.section508.gov.

“The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.”
― Barack Obama


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of David Farough
Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2015 10:07 AM
To: WebAIM Discussion List
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] sample ADA statement for website?

Hi Michelle:

I think perhaps in this case Whitney was referring to how a user with vision scans or reads the page. Many factors can effect a persons ability to comprehend or understand content that is presented.

David Farough
(819) 420-8418



>>> "Clark, Michelle - NRCS, Washington, DC"
< = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > 09:48 AM Tuesday, March 24, 2015 >>> Hi Whitney,

I am a little confused. With the problems that is known about scanned documents and what they can give users of assistive technology, I do not understand why there is a reference to using scanned document in your statement below. Please give me clarification. Is it assumed the user would use OCR?

Thank You,
Michelle Clark
Information Technology Specialist
Section 508 Coordinator
Office of the Chief Information Officer USDA / Natural Resources Conservation Service
1400 Independence Ave. SW.
Rm. 1669-S
Washington, DC. 20250

O: 202 2609014
E-mail: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
To learn more about Section 508, go to www.section508.gov.

“The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something.
Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.”
― Barack Obama


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Whitney Quesenbery via WebAIM-Forum
Sent: Sunday, March 22, 2015 7:29 AM
To: Cliff Tyllick; WebAIM Discussion List; Mike Warner
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] sample ADA statement for website?

Cheers to Cliff for bringing up the style and tone of the conversation and how important plain language is for so many people.

The principles for accessible UX (from A Web for Everyone) on this topic
are:

Plain Language: Creates a conversation:
People can read, understand, and use the information.

- Write for your audience.
- Follow plain language guidelines for writing content.
- Write sentences and paragraphs for easy scanning.
- Support users through their tasks.
- Structure the whole page for scanning and comprehension.
- Write helpful links.
- Use language your audience is familiar with, or provide definitions.
- Provide plain language summaries of complex content.
- Don’t rely on readability formulas.
- Usability test your content.

I've done a number of presentations on the topic, including at CSUN and the Accessibility Summit. They tend to be tailored for the audience, so content examples differ, but this presentation has the basics.
http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/content-for-everyone-20599326

And, I'm teaching sessions on accessible content, plain language and writing great alt text at AccessU this May, along with a great lineup of
instructors: http://www.knowbility.org/v/john-slatin-accessu/





On Sat, Mar 21, 2015 at 2:27 PM Cliff Tyllick via WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Hi, Mike!
>
> Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately

> available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is
> that your statement will more favorably impress more people if you
> take a few minutes to review it using the principles of plain
language.
>
> In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good
friend.
> You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how
> complaints can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call
me."
>
> Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in

> that direct, active voice.
>
> Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their
> frustration with the experience will still be able to get your
message
> quickly.
>
> And because this more personal approach makes the point that you
added
> this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a

> barrier.
>
> In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems

> to be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate
risk,
> so they made us put it here."
>
> I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come

> across that way?
>
> Cliff Tyllick
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages
are
> its fault.
>
> > On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum <
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
> >
> > Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that
> > paragraph with contact instructions:
> >
> > Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS

> > and courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
> >
> > Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm
working
> > on a VPAT now to link to from that same page.
> >
> > Mike Warner
> > Director of IT Services
> > MindEdge, Inc.
> >
> > 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
> >
> >> Hi all,
> >>
> >> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that
we've
> >> got enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's

> >> download link is broken. We test every new course and feature
> >> first using JAWS ourselves, then we have a blind consultant
> >> re-test. We haven't had any complaints from any of the visually
impaired students we've enrolled.
> >> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
> >>
> >> Here is our current ADA statement:
> >> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
> learners
> >> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with
> >> Disabilities Act
> >> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have
> >> accessibility experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and

> >> new features for learner experience and compatibility with the
most
> >> commonly used
> assistive
> >> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety
of
> methods
> >> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
> >>
> >> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
> >>
> >> Thank you,
> >>
> >> Mike Warner
> >> Director of IT Services
> >> MindEdge, Inc.
> > > > > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
> > > list messages to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>
Ce courriel est destiné exclusivement au destinataire mentionné en titre et peut contenir de l'information privilégiée, confidentielle ou soustraite à la communication aux termes des lois applicables. Toute divulgation non autorisée, toute reproduction ou réacheminement est interdit. Si vous n'êtes pas le destinataire de ce courriel, ou n'êtes pas autorisé par le destinataire visé, ou encore, si vous l'avez reçu par erreur, veuillez le mentionner immédiatement à l'expéditeur et supprimer le courriel et les copies.

This e-mail message is intended for the named recipient(s) and may contain information that is privileged, confidential and/or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. Unauthorized disclosure, copying or re-transmission is prohibited. If you are not a named recipient or not authorized by the named recipient(s), or if you have received this e-mail in error, then please notify the sender immediately and delete the message and any copies.

From: Mike Warner
Date: Tue, Mar 24 2015 12:51PM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Thanks, Cliff and Whitney. Sorry for my delayed response. I was out and
then working on our VPAT.

That text and email link are on our corporate site, which is generally only
seen by partners/re-sellers. That's why is sounds, well, so corporate.
Given that we sell online courses, and the vast majority of students never
see our corp or retail sites, should I put this info in the course system
somewhere where the students can find it? Maybe a link to a
student-friendly version of it in the footer after the copyright? I would
put it on the login page, but we integrate tightly with partner course
systems, so the bulk of our students never see the login page.

Mike


Mike Warner
Director of IT Services
MindEdge, Inc.

2015-03-22 7:29 GMT-04:00 Whitney Quesenbery < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:

> Cheers to Cliff for bringing up the style and tone of the conversation and
> how important plain language is for so many people.
>
> The principles for accessible UX (from A Web for Everyone) on this topic
> are:
>
> Plain Language: Creates a conversation:
> People can read, understand, and use the information.
>
> - Write for your audience.
> - Follow plain language guidelines for writing content.
> - Write sentences and paragraphs for easy scanning.
> - Support users through their tasks.
> - Structure the whole page for scanning and comprehension.
> - Write helpful links.
> - Use language your audience is familiar with, or provide definitions.
> - Provide plain language summaries of complex content.
> - Don’t rely on readability formulas.
> - Usability test your content.
>
> I've done a number of presentations on the topic, including at CSUN and
> the Accessibility Summit. They tend to be tailored for the audience, so
> content examples differ, but this presentation has the basics.
> http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/content-for-everyone-20599326
>
> And, I'm teaching sessions on accessible content, plain language and
> writing great alt text at AccessU this May, along with a great lineup of
> instructors: http://www.knowbility.org/v/john-slatin-accessu/
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 21, 2015 at 2:27 PM Cliff Tyllick via WebAIM-Forum <
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
>> Hi, Mike!
>>
>> Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately
>> available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is that
>> your statement will more favorably impress more people if you take a few
>> minutes to review it using the principles of plain language.
>>
>> In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good friend.
>> You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how complaints
>> can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call me."
>>
>> Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in that
>> direct, active voice.
>>
>> Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their
>> frustration with the experience will still be able to get your message
>> quickly.
>>
>> And because this more personal approach makes the point that you added
>> this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a
>> barrier.
>>
>> In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems to
>> be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate risk, so they
>> made us put it here."
>>
>> I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come
>> across that way?
>>
>> Cliff Tyllick
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are
>> its fault.
>>
>> > On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum <
>> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>> >
>> > Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that paragraph
>> > with contact instructions:
>> >
>> > Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS and
>> > courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
>> >
>> > Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm working on
>> a
>> > VPAT now to link to from that same page.
>> >
>> > Mike Warner
>> > Director of IT Services
>> > MindEdge, Inc.
>> >
>> > 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
>> >
>> >> Hi all,
>> >>
>> >> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've got
>> >> enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's
>> download
>> >> link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
>> >> ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
>> >> complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
>> >> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>> >>
>> >> Here is our current ADA statement:
>> >> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
>> learners
>> >> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities
>> Act
>> >> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
>> >> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
>> >> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used
>> assistive
>> >> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of
>> methods
>> >> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>> >>
>> >> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>> >>
>> >> Thank you,
>> >>
>> >> Mike Warner
>> >> Director of IT Services
>> >> MindEdge, Inc.
>> > >> > >> > >> >> >> >>
>

From: Cliff Tyllick
Date: Tue, Mar 24 2015 3:15PM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | Next message →

Mike, I think that's a great idea. Definitely do put it somewhere that's easy for the students to find. They will appreciate it—and I'll bet your products will stand out from all the others in that respect.

Cliff

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Mar 24, 2015, at 1:51 PM, Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Thanks, Cliff and Whitney. Sorry for my delayed response. I was out and then working on our VPAT.
>
> That text and email link are on our corporate site, which is generally only seen by partners/re-sellers. That's why is sounds, well, so corporate. Given that we sell online courses, and the vast majority of students never see our corp or retail sites, should I put this info in the course system somewhere where the students can find it? Maybe a link to a student-friendly version of it in the footer after the copyright? I would put it on the login page, but we integrate tightly with partner course systems, so the bulk of our students never see the login page.
>
> Mike
>
>
> Mike Warner
> Director of IT Services
> MindEdge, Inc.
>
> 2015-03-22 7:29 GMT-04:00 Whitney Quesenbery < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
>> Cheers to Cliff for bringing up the style and tone of the conversation and how important plain language is for so many people.
>>
>> The principles for accessible UX (from A Web for Everyone) on this topic are:
>>
>> Plain Language: Creates a conversation:
>> People can read, understand, and use the information.
>>
>> - Write for your audience.
>> - Follow plain language guidelines for writing content.
>> - Write sentences and paragraphs for easy scanning.
>> - Support users through their tasks.
>> - Structure the whole page for scanning and comprehension.
>> - Write helpful links.
>> - Use language your audience is familiar with, or provide definitions.
>> - Provide plain language summaries of complex content.
>> - Don’t rely on readability formulas.
>> - Usability test your content.
>>
>> I've done a number of presentations on the topic, including at CSUN and the Accessibility Summit. They tend to be tailored for the audience, so content examples differ, but this presentation has the basics. http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/content-for-everyone-20599326
>>
>> And, I'm teaching sessions on accessible content, plain language and writing great alt text at AccessU this May, along with a great lineup of instructors: http://www.knowbility.org/v/john-slatin-accessu/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Sat, Mar 21, 2015 at 2:27 PM Cliff Tyllick via WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>>> Hi, Mike!
>>>
>>> Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is that your statement will more favorably impress more people if you take a few minutes to review it using the principles of plain language.
>>>
>>> In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good friend. You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how complaints can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call me."
>>>
>>> Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in that direct, active voice.
>>>
>>> Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their frustration with the experience will still be able to get your message quickly.
>>>
>>> And because this more personal approach makes the point that you added this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a barrier.
>>>
>>> In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems to be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate risk, so they made us put it here."
>>>
>>> I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come across that way?
>>>
>>> Cliff Tyllick
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.
>>>
>>> > On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that paragraph
>>> > with contact instructions:
>>> >
>>> > Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS and
>>> > courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
>>> >
>>> > Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm working on a
>>> > VPAT now to link to from that same page.
>>> >
>>> > Mike Warner
>>> > Director of IT Services
>>> > MindEdge, Inc.
>>> >
>>> > 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
>>> >
>>> >> Hi all,
>>> >>
>>> >> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've got
>>> >> enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's download
>>> >> link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
>>> >> ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
>>> >> complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
>>> >> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>>> >>
>>> >> Here is our current ADA statement:
>>> >> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for learners
>>> >> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
>>> >> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
>>> >> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
>>> >> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used assistive
>>> >> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of methods
>>> >> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>>> >>
>>> >> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>>> >>
>>> >> Thank you,
>>> >>
>>> >> Mike Warner
>>> >> Director of IT Services
>>> >> MindEdge, Inc.
>>> > >>> > >>> > >>> >>> >>> >

From: Whitney Quesenbery
Date: Wed, Mar 25 2015 6:05AM
Subject: Re: sample ADA statement for website?
← Previous message | No next message

Michelle, As someone has already said "Structure the whole page for
scanning and comprehension." is talking about how someone quickly looks
through the page (scans) and understands what it says (comprehension).

Although scanning is usually thought of a visual activity, people using
screen readers can also effectively scan the page, if it is designed and
written to make it easy to jump from chunk to chunk of text quickly
understanding the gist of each one. As an example, headings should have
both a good visual presentation that not only makes them distinct but also
promotes reading as well as appropriate semantic markup.

On the visual point, the design of headings can fail when they are too
similar to the rest of the text, but also when they err in the other
direction: hard-to-read fonts, type that is too large, all capitals, and
other typgraphic styling can "suggest" that they are just decorative
elements and not important text, meant to support users in scanning the
page for meaning.

Whitney

On Tue, Mar 24, 2015 at 5:15 PM Cliff Tyllick < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Mike, I think that's a great idea. Definitely do put it somewhere that's
> easy for the students to find. They will appreciate it—and I'll bet your
> products will stand out from all the others in that respect.
>
> Cliff
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its
> fault.
>
> On Mar 24, 2015, at 1:51 PM, Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Thanks, Cliff and Whitney. Sorry for my delayed response. I was out and
> then working on our VPAT.
>
> That text and email link are on our corporate site, which is generally
> only seen by partners/re-sellers. That's why is sounds, well, so
> corporate. Given that we sell online courses, and the vast majority of
> students never see our corp or retail sites, should I put this info in the
> course system somewhere where the students can find it? Maybe a link to a
> student-friendly version of it in the footer after the copyright? I would
> put it on the login page, but we integrate tightly with partner course
> systems, so the bulk of our students never see the login page.
>
> Mike
>
>
> Mike Warner
> Director of IT Services
> MindEdge, Inc.
>
> 2015-03-22 7:29 GMT-04:00 Whitney Quesenbery < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
>
>> Cheers to Cliff for bringing up the style and tone of the conversation
>> and how important plain language is for so many people.
>>
>> The principles for accessible UX (from A Web for Everyone) on this topic
>> are:
>>
>> Plain Language: Creates a conversation:
>> People can read, understand, and use the information.
>>
>> - Write for your audience.
>> - Follow plain language guidelines for writing content.
>> - Write sentences and paragraphs for easy scanning.
>> - Support users through their tasks.
>> - Structure the whole page for scanning and comprehension.
>> - Write helpful links.
>> - Use language your audience is familiar with, or provide definitions.
>> - Provide plain language summaries of complex content.
>> - Don’t rely on readability formulas.
>> - Usability test your content.
>>
>> I've done a number of presentations on the topic, including at CSUN and
>> the Accessibility Summit. They tend to be tailored for the audience, so
>> content examples differ, but this presentation has the basics.
>> http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/content-for-everyone-20599326
>>
>> And, I'm teaching sessions on accessible content, plain language and
>> writing great alt text at AccessU this May, along with a great lineup of
>> instructors: http://www.knowbility.org/v/john-slatin-accessu/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Mar 21, 2015 at 2:27 PM Cliff Tyllick via WebAIM-Forum <
>> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>>
>>> Hi, Mike!
>>>
>>> Yes, it's an excellent feature to have the e-mail address immediately
>>> available, but one of the more important points I hoped to make is that
>>> your statement will more favorably impress more people if you take a few
>>> minutes to review it using the principles of plain language.
>>>
>>> In other words, write as if you were speaking directly to a good friend.
>>> You wouldn't tell a chum who was struggling with a tutorial how complaints
>>> can be made—you'd say, "If you run into trouble, call me."
>>>
>>> Or words to that effect—but, most of all, with simpler words and in that
>>> direct, active voice.
>>>
>>> Why? Because it's clearer, so people who are distracted by their
>>> frustration with the experience will still be able to get your message
>>> quickly.
>>>
>>> And because this more personal approach makes the point that you added
>>> this message because you care about me, the person who has run into a
>>> barrier.
>>>
>>> In third person, passive voice, and big words, the same message seems to
>>> be there because "Legal thinks this wording reduces corporate risk, so they
>>> made us put it here."
>>>
>>> I'm sure you're doing this because you care, so why not make it come
>>> across that way?
>>>
>>> Cliff Tyllick
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are
>>> its fault.
>>>
>>> > On Mar 20, 2015, at 3:59 PM, Mike Warner via WebAIM-Forum <
>>> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Thanks for the feedback. We do have a sentence following that paragraph
>>> > with contact instructions:
>>> >
>>> > Feedback and questions regarding accessibility in the MindEdge LMS and
>>> > courses can be directed to = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = .
>>> >
>>> > Sorry, I forgot to include that in my original message. I'm working
>>> on a
>>> > VPAT now to link to from that same page.
>>> >
>>> > Mike Warner
>>> > Director of IT Services
>>> > MindEdge, Inc.
>>> >
>>> > 2015-03-20 11:17 GMT-04:00 Mike Warner < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >:
>>> >
>>> >> Hi all,
>>> >>
>>> >> I'm looking for a few sample ADA statements to make sure that we've
>>> got
>>> >> enough info in ours. I tried section508.gov, but the sample's
>>> download
>>> >> link is broken. We test every new course and feature first using JAWS
>>> >> ourselves, then we have a blind consultant re-test. We haven't had any
>>> >> complaints from any of the visually impaired students we've enrolled.
>>> >> We've actually received praise from a couple of students.
>>> >>
>>> >> Here is our current ADA statement:
>>> >> MindEdge, Inc. is committed to the principle of equal access for
>>> learners
>>> >> with disabilities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities
>>> Act
>>> >> (ADA) and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. We have accessibility
>>> >> experts on staff who thoroughly test our courses and new features for
>>> >> learner experience and compatibility with the most commonly used
>>> assistive
>>> >> technologies. Learners are able to contact us through a variety of
>>> methods
>>> >> within the course regarding any accessibility issues.
>>> >>
>>> >> Does that need any more detail, or is it fine as it is?
>>> >>
>>> >> Thank you,
>>> >>
>>> >> Mike Warner
>>> >> Director of IT Services
>>> >> MindEdge, Inc.
>>> > >>> > >>> > >>> >>> >>> >>>
>>
>