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Thread: Verbiage for button and link interactions

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Number of posts in this thread: 11 (In chronological order)

From: Christopher Myers
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 7:02AM
Subject: Verbiage for button and link interactions
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Hi!

I'm passing along a question for a colleague --

They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.

Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.

So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?

Thanks!

Chris

From: Patrick H. Lauke
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 7:07AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
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Depends on context. For buttons, for instance, you could use the actual
name of the button, or copywrite it in a generic way such as "choose the
'continue' button", "use the 'add to cart' button" or similar.

For links, you could "follow the link...", "open the link..."

"Press the 'Submit' button" is also a fairly generic phrase that should
be understandable to all input modalities.

P

On 16/12/2016 14:02, Christopher Myers wrote:
> Hi!
>
> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
>
> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.
>
> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.
>
> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chris
> > > > >


--
Patrick H. Lauke

www.splintered.co.uk | https://github.com/patrickhlauke
http://flickr.com/photos/redux/ | http://redux.deviantart.com
twitter: @patrick_h_lauke | skype: patrick_h_lauke

From: Moore,Michael (Accessibility) (HHSC)
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 7:09AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
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I believe that "click" has been the common vernacular for so long that it is the choice that I would make. Another alternative that we use is "Select" which is more universal. "Select the buy now button" One thing to keep in mind is that buttons should look, act and be semantically represented as buttons and links should look, act and be semantically represented as links. Doing this allows screen reader and dictation software users to command their assistive technologies to select the correct item. For example am looking for a buy now button and bring up a list of buttons in JAWS but the button is actually a link I will not see it in the list.

Mike Moore
Accessibility Coordinator
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
Civil Rights Office
(512) 438-3431 (Office)

-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Christopher Myers
Sent: Friday, December 16, 2016 8:02 AM
To: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
Subject: [WebAIM] Verbiage for button and link interactions

Hi!

I'm passing along a question for a colleague --

They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.

Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.

So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?

Thanks!

Chris

From: JP Jamous
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 7:09AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
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How about Execute? The user will figure out whether to tap or click or hit enter. I use that term very often.

-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Christopher Myers
Sent: Friday, December 16, 2016 8:02 AM
To: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
Subject: [WebAIM] Verbiage for button and link interactions

Hi!

I'm passing along a question for a colleague --

They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.

Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.

So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?

Thanks!

Chris

From: Aaron Cannon
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 7:12AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
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I often use the words activate or trigger.

--
This message was sent from a mobile device


> On Dec 16, 2016, at 08:02, Christopher Myers < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Hi!
>
> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
>
> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.
>
> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.
>
> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chris
> > > >

From: Aaron Cannon
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 7:23AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
← Previous message | Next message →

On the other hand, if this documentation is aimed at end-users, I think almost everybody understands what click means, even if they are on a touchscreen device, keyboard, or using a screen reader.

Although it may not be technically precise, I would argue that it's probably The word most likely to be widely understood.

--
This message was sent from a mobile device


> On Dec 16, 2016, at 08:02, Christopher Myers < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Hi!
>
> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
>
> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.
>
> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.
>
> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chris
> > > >

From: EA Draffan
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 8:17AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
← Previous message | Next message →

I have to admit that I often find myself using the term 'select' for actions that require a click or tap.

Best wishes
E.A.
Sent from my mobile phone

> On 16 Dec 2016, at 14:07, Patrick H. Lauke < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Depends on context. For buttons, for instance, you could use the actual name of the button, or copywrite it in a generic way such as "choose the 'continue' button", "use the 'add to cart' button" or similar.
>
> For links, you could "follow the link...", "open the link..."
>
> "Press the 'Submit' button" is also a fairly generic phrase that should be understandable to all input modalities.
>
> P
>
>> On 16/12/2016 14:02, Christopher Myers wrote:
>> Hi!
>>
>> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
>>
>> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.
>>
>> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.
>>
>> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Chris
>> >> >> >> >>
>
>
> --
> Patrick H. Lauke
>
> www.splintered.co.uk | https://github.com/patrickhlauke
> http://flickr.com/photos/redux/ | http://redux.deviantart.com
> twitter: @patrick_h_lauke | skype: patrick_h_lauke
> > > >

From: Karl Brown
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 8:26AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
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I tend to go with "use" because it's a simpler verb, e.g., "use the Add to
Basket button to add to your shopping basket". "Use the buy now button to
buy a Fisher Price toy".

I try to avoid things like "select" because I've seen people try to click
and drag as if highlighting text.

There are times I'll go with "press" or "click" if it makes sense than
saying "use" in the context of what I'm writing, but normally "use" works
well.

On Fri, Dec 16, 2016 at 3:17 PM, EA Draffan < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> I have to admit that I often find myself using the term 'select' for
> actions that require a click or tap.
>
> Best wishes
> E.A.
> Sent from my mobile phone
>
> > On 16 Dec 2016, at 14:07, Patrick H. Lauke < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
> wrote:
> >
> > Depends on context. For buttons, for instance, you could use the actual
> name of the button, or copywrite it in a generic way such as "choose the
> 'continue' button", "use the 'add to cart' button" or similar.
> >
> > For links, you could "follow the link...", "open the link..."
> >
> > "Press the 'Submit' button" is also a fairly generic phrase that should
> be understandable to all input modalities.
> >
> > P
> >
> >> On 16/12/2016 14:02, Christopher Myers wrote:
> >> Hi!
> >>
> >> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
> >>
> >> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying
> to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links
> and buttons.
> >>
> >> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say
> it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and
> accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when
> they're using a pointing device with buttons.
> >>
> >> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to
> one's interactions with "pressable" objects?
> >>
> >> Thanks!
> >>
> >> Chris
> >> > >> > >> > >> > >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Patrick H. Lauke
> >
> > www.splintered.co.uk | https://github.com/patrickhlauke
> > http://flickr.com/photos/redux/ | http://redux.deviantart.com
> > twitter: @patrick_h_lauke | skype: patrick_h_lauke
> > > > > > > > > > > > >



--
Karl Brown
Twitter: @kbdevelops
Skype: kbdevelopment

Professional Certificate Web Accessibility Compliance (Distinction),
University of South Australia, 2015

From: Anne Godlewski
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 8:58AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi Chris,

If your colleagues are anything like the technical documentation team I worked on, they probably want a single term that can apply to all cases. Our first go-to resource was the Microsoft Manual of Style, as this was the most authoritative style guide published for tech documentation. I don't have the book in my personal library (nor do I remember what the style guide had to say about pressable objects), but I see online that "click" and "tap" both appear in the style guide's "usage dictionary," so if you can get your hands on the book, you might be able to get additional insight. I also see that there's an entire chapter on accessibility, so they might address the topic there too.

Anne

On 2016-12-16, at 9:02 AM, Christopher Myers wrote:

> Hi!
>
> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
>
> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.
>
> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.
>
> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chris
> > > >

From: Christopher Myers
Date: Fri, Dec 16 2016 1:59PM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
← Previous message | Next message →

Awesome, thanks so much for your responses! I passed them all along to my colleague, and I'm sure she'll be appreciative as well :)

Chris

>>>


From: Anne Godlewski < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
To:WebAIM Discussion List < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
Date: 12/16/2016 9:58 AM
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] Verbiage for button and link interactions
Hi Chris,

If your colleagues are anything like the technical documentation team I worked on, they probably want a single term that can apply to all cases. Our first go-to resource was the Microsoft Manual of Style, as this was the most authoritative style guide published for tech documentation. I don't have the book in my personal library (nor do I remember what the style guide had to say about pressable objects), but I see online that "click" and "tap" both appear in the style guide's "usage dictionary," so if you can get your hands on the book, you might be able to get additional insight. I also see that there's an entire chapter on accessibility, so they might address the topic there too.

Anne

On 2016-12-16, at 9:02 AM, Christopher Myers wrote:

> Hi!
>
> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
>
> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and buttons.
>
> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when they're using a pointing device with buttons.
>
> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's interactions with "pressable" objects?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chris
> > > >

From: Joy Relton
Date: Mon, Dec 19 2016 6:27AM
Subject: Re: Verbiage for button and link interactions
← Previous message | No next message

How about "activate"?


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf
Of Aaron Cannon
Sent: Friday, December 16, 2016 9:23 AM
To: WebAIM Discussion List
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] Verbiage for button and link interactions

On the other hand, if this documentation is aimed at end-users, I think
almost everybody understands what click means, even if they are on a
touchscreen device, keyboard, or using a screen reader.

Although it may not be technically precise, I would argue that it's probably
The word most likely to be widely understood.

--
This message was sent from a mobile device


> On Dec 16, 2016, at 08:02, Christopher Myers < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
> wrote:
>
> Hi!
>
> I'm passing along a question for a colleague --
>
> They're working on documentation for an online process, and are trying to
> figure out how to best phrase the interaction that users do with links and
> buttons.
>
> Some of their coworkers say that it should be "click," but others say it
> should be "tap." Their reasoning behind "tap" is for mobile devices and
> accessibility programs. But other users would be confused by "tap" when
> they're using a pointing device with buttons.
>
> So, I was just curious if there's a "universal" way of referring to one's
> interactions with "pressable" objects?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chris
> > > archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> http://webaim.org/discussion/archives