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Thread: WordPress Accessibility

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Number of posts in this thread: 7 (In chronological order)

From: JP Jamous
Date: Sun, Jun 09 2019 2:45PM
Subject: WordPress Accessibility
No previous message | Next message →

Hi folks,



I have a unique situation. There is a WordPress blog running on ServerX. I
have a client who wants to have access to that blog and show it on his web
site. His web site uses ServerY.



While ServerY does not run WordPress at all, developers decided to use a PHP
function that would retrieve the page from the WordPress database. They will
then show it on a particular page on ServerY, because it would be all of the
HTML/text of that blog.



1. Users on ServerX can create their own blogs and they drag and drop
all type of content. WCAG is not included at all. For example all of the
headings could be H1s.
2. Whenever they create that blog, the blog is pages are saved to the
WordPress database.
3. The first attempt for my client's developers is to grab the blog
content and show it on my client's web site, which runs Apache only.
4. The next phase will be to allow visitors on my client's site to
respond to blog comments from that web site.



While I am not concerned about the server-side stuff, I have not been able
to find a way to apply accessibility to this project. It seems to me that
the content authors that will be creating the blog in the first place, must
use proper heading levels and all that good stuff. There isn't anything
programmatic that my client's developers can do to ensure that imported
content conforms to WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines.



Has anyone worked on something like that in the past? Are there any PHP or
add-ins that can be used to automate the process to achieve a better A11Y
access? I know quite well that not all WCAG guidelines can be automated.
Many require manual testing. Yet, if we can automate, whichever guidelines
we can, that will definitely help the page.



Any feedback or articles are greatly appreciated.







--------------------

JP Jamous

Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer

<mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > E-Mail Me | <http://linkedin.com/in/JPJamous>; Join
My LinkedIn Network

--------------------

From: Chanel Carlascio
Date: Sun, Jun 09 2019 3:36PM
Subject: Re: WordPress Accessibility
← Previous message | Next message →

I am not sure if this will help you, but I did find a number of Wordpress
plugins that claim to address accessibility:

https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/accessibility/

And a number of themes that claim to be accessible:
https://wordpress.org/themes/tags/accessibility-ready/

I’d love to hear if any of these are a good work around for you.



On June 9, 2019 at 1:45:11 PM, JP Jamous ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ) wrote:

Hi folks,



I have a unique situation. There is a WordPress blog running on ServerX. I
have a client who wants to have access to that blog and show it on his web
site. His web site uses ServerY.



While ServerY does not run WordPress at all, developers decided to use a
PHP
function that would retrieve the page from the WordPress database. They
will
then show it on a particular page on ServerY, because it would be all of
the
HTML/text of that blog.



1. Users on ServerX can create their own blogs and they drag and drop
all type of content. WCAG is not included at all. For example all of the
headings could be H1s.
2. Whenever they create that blog, the blog is pages are saved to the
WordPress database.
3. The first attempt for my client's developers is to grab the blog
content and show it on my client's web site, which runs Apache only.
4. The next phase will be to allow visitors on my client's site to
respond to blog comments from that web site.



While I am not concerned about the server-side stuff, I have not been able
to find a way to apply accessibility to this project. It seems to me that
the content authors that will be creating the blog in the first place, must
use proper heading levels and all that good stuff. There isn't anything
programmatic that my client's developers can do to ensure that imported
content conforms to WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines.



Has anyone worked on something like that in the past? Are there any PHP or
add-ins that can be used to automate the process to achieve a better A11Y
access? I know quite well that not all WCAG guidelines can be automated.
Many require manual testing. Yet, if we can automate, whichever guidelines
we can, that will definitely help the page.



Any feedback or articles are greatly appreciated.







--------------------

JP Jamous

Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer

<mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > E-Mail Me | <http://linkedin.com/in/JPJamous>; Join
My LinkedIn Network

--------------------

From: Amanda J. Rush
Date: Sun, Jun 09 2019 4:35PM
Subject: Re: WordPress Accessibility
← Previous message | Next message →

Themes can address some of this to a certain extent, but accessibility
ready themes from the WordPress repo are still dependent on content
being entered accessibly for the most part. There's no way to slap a
theme and plugins together as part of a WordPress installation and get
accessible sites without the authors creating accessible content. The
devs on the non-WordPress sites could grab the content via the rest API
and then mark it up on the non-WordPress sites, but they'll probably
need at least some custom endpoints to make that work if they're dealing
with any custom post types along with the standard posts. Otherwise,
it's all down to the authors and then the WordPress site being
accessible itself.


Amanda



On 6/9/2019 5:36 PM, Chanel Carlascio wrote:
> I am not sure if this will help you, but I did find a number of Wordpress
> plugins that claim to address accessibility:
>
> https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/accessibility/
>
> And a number of themes that claim to be accessible:
> https://wordpress.org/themes/tags/accessibility-ready/
>
> I’d love to hear if any of these are a good work around for you.
>
>
>
> On June 9, 2019 at 1:45:11 PM, JP Jamous ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ) wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
>
>
>
> I have a unique situation. There is a WordPress blog running on ServerX. I
> have a client who wants to have access to that blog and show it on his web
> site. His web site uses ServerY.
>
>
>
> While ServerY does not run WordPress at all, developers decided to use a
> PHP
> function that would retrieve the page from the WordPress database. They
> will
> then show it on a particular page on ServerY, because it would be all of
> the
> HTML/text of that blog.
>
>
>
> 1. Users on ServerX can create their own blogs and they drag and drop
> all type of content. WCAG is not included at all. For example all of the
> headings could be H1s.
> 2. Whenever they create that blog, the blog is pages are saved to the
> WordPress database.
> 3. The first attempt for my client's developers is to grab the blog
> content and show it on my client's web site, which runs Apache only.
> 4. The next phase will be to allow visitors on my client's site to
> respond to blog comments from that web site.
>
>
>
> While I am not concerned about the server-side stuff, I have not been able
> to find a way to apply accessibility to this project. It seems to me that
> the content authors that will be creating the blog in the first place, must
> use proper heading levels and all that good stuff. There isn't anything
> programmatic that my client's developers can do to ensure that imported
> content conforms to WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines.
>
>
>
> Has anyone worked on something like that in the past? Are there any PHP or
> add-ins that can be used to automate the process to achieve a better A11Y
> access? I know quite well that not all WCAG guidelines can be automated.
> Many require manual testing. Yet, if we can automate, whichever guidelines
> we can, that will definitely help the page.
>
>
>
> Any feedback or articles are greatly appreciated.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --------------------
>
> JP Jamous
>
> Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer
>
> <mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > E-Mail Me | <http://linkedin.com/in/JPJamous>; Join
> My LinkedIn Network
>
> --------------------
>
>
>
>
>
> > > > > > > >

From: Chanel Carlascio
Date: Sun, Jun 09 2019 5:53PM
Subject: Re: WordPress Accessibility
← Previous message | Next message →

Yes, thank you for making that clear Amanda. I didn’t mean to imply that
all that would be needed would be the themes and/or the plug-in. It might
help resolve some aspects of what is going on, but certainly not all of it.
I have used accessible themes/plug-ins in the past, and while they help -
they still required a lot of work to meet the standards.


On June 9, 2019 at 3:36:06 PM, Amanda J. Rush ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = )
wrote:

Themes can address some of this to a certain extent, but accessibility
ready themes from the WordPress repo are still dependent on content
being entered accessibly for the most part. There's no way to slap a
theme and plugins together as part of a WordPress installation and get
accessible sites without the authors creating accessible content. The
devs on the non-WordPress sites could grab the content via the rest API
and then mark it up on the non-WordPress sites, but they'll probably
need at least some custom endpoints to make that work if they're dealing
with any custom post types along with the standard posts. Otherwise,
it's all down to the authors and then the WordPress site being
accessible itself.


Amanda



On 6/9/2019 5:36 PM, Chanel Carlascio wrote:
> I am not sure if this will help you, but I did find a number of Wordpress
> plugins that claim to address accessibility:
>
> https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/accessibility/
>
> And a number of themes that claim to be accessible:
> https://wordpress.org/themes/tags/accessibility-ready/
>
> I’d love to hear if any of these are a good work around for you.
>
>
>
> On June 9, 2019 at 1:45:11 PM, JP Jamous ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ) wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
>
>
>
> I have a unique situation. There is a WordPress blog running on ServerX. I
> have a client who wants to have access to that blog and show it on his web
> site. His web site uses ServerY.
>
>
>
> While ServerY does not run WordPress at all, developers decided to use a
> PHP
> function that would retrieve the page from the WordPress database. They
> will
> then show it on a particular page on ServerY, because it would be all of
> the
> HTML/text of that blog.
>
>
>
> 1. Users on ServerX can create their own blogs and they drag and drop
> all type of content. WCAG is not included at all. For example all of the
> headings could be H1s.
> 2. Whenever they create that blog, the blog is pages are saved to the
> WordPress database.
> 3. The first attempt for my client's developers is to grab the blog
> content and show it on my client's web site, which runs Apache only.
> 4. The next phase will be to allow visitors on my client's site to
> respond to blog comments from that web site.
>
>
>
> While I am not concerned about the server-side stuff, I have not been able
> to find a way to apply accessibility to this project. It seems to me that
> the content authors that will be creating the blog in the first place,
must
> use proper heading levels and all that good stuff. There isn't anything
> programmatic that my client's developers can do to ensure that imported
> content conforms to WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines.
>
>
>
> Has anyone worked on something like that in the past? Are there any PHP or
> add-ins that can be used to automate the process to achieve a better A11Y
> access? I know quite well that not all WCAG guidelines can be automated.
> Many require manual testing. Yet, if we can automate, whichever guidelines
> we can, that will definitely help the page.
>
>
>
> Any feedback or articles are greatly appreciated.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --------------------
>
> JP Jamous
>
> Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer
>
> <mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > E-Mail Me | <http://linkedin.com/in/JPJamous>; Join
> My LinkedIn Network
>
> --------------------
>
>
>
>
>
> > > > > > > >

From: Graham Armfield
Date: Mon, Jun 10 2019 2:11AM
Subject: Re: WordPress Accessibility
← Previous message | Next message →

Maybe slightly tangential to the discussion, but there is a new(ish)
WordPress plugin that can help content editors and authors deliver
accessible content within a WordPress site.

The plugin is called Content Author Accessibility Preview and it can be
found at:
https://wordpress.org/plugins/content-author-accessibility-preview/

The plugin is still in its infancy and there is still lots to do.
Improvements are being worked on, but the idea is to flag up potential
acessibility issues whenever a user uses the 'Preview' functionality in the
content editor. It can also work in the Customiser also.

Feel free to suggest enhancements via GitHub at:
https://github.com/boswall/Content-Author-Accessibility-Preview/issues


Regards
Graham Armfield

coolfields.co.uk <http://www.coolfields.co.uk/>;
M:07905 590026
T: 01483 856613



On Mon, 10 Jun 2019 at 00:53, Chanel Carlascio < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Yes, thank you for making that clear Amanda. I didn’t mean to imply that
> all that would be needed would be the themes and/or the plug-in. It might
> help resolve some aspects of what is going on, but certainly not all of it.
> I have used accessible themes/plug-ins in the past, and while they help -
> they still required a lot of work to meet the standards.
>
>
> On June 9, 2019 at 3:36:06 PM, Amanda J. Rush ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = )
> wrote:
>
> Themes can address some of this to a certain extent, but accessibility
> ready themes from the WordPress repo are still dependent on content
> being entered accessibly for the most part. There's no way to slap a
> theme and plugins together as part of a WordPress installation and get
> accessible sites without the authors creating accessible content. The
> devs on the non-WordPress sites could grab the content via the rest API
> and then mark it up on the non-WordPress sites, but they'll probably
> need at least some custom endpoints to make that work if they're dealing
> with any custom post types along with the standard posts. Otherwise,
> it's all down to the authors and then the WordPress site being
> accessible itself.
>
>
> Amanda
>
>
>
> On 6/9/2019 5:36 PM, Chanel Carlascio wrote:
> > I am not sure if this will help you, but I did find a number of Wordpress
> > plugins that claim to address accessibility:
> >
> > https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/accessibility/
> >
> > And a number of themes that claim to be accessible:
> > https://wordpress.org/themes/tags/accessibility-ready/
> >
> > I’d love to hear if any of these are a good work around for you.
> >
> >
> >
> > On June 9, 2019 at 1:45:11 PM, JP Jamous ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ) wrote:
> >
> > Hi folks,
> >
> >
> >
> > I have a unique situation. There is a WordPress blog running on ServerX.
> I
> > have a client who wants to have access to that blog and show it on his
> web
> > site. His web site uses ServerY.
> >
> >
> >
> > While ServerY does not run WordPress at all, developers decided to use a
> > PHP
> > function that would retrieve the page from the WordPress database. They
> > will
> > then show it on a particular page on ServerY, because it would be all of
> > the
> > HTML/text of that blog.
> >
> >
> >
> > 1. Users on ServerX can create their own blogs and they drag and drop
> > all type of content. WCAG is not included at all. For example all of the
> > headings could be H1s.
> > 2. Whenever they create that blog, the blog is pages are saved to the
> > WordPress database.
> > 3. The first attempt for my client's developers is to grab the blog
> > content and show it on my client's web site, which runs Apache only.
> > 4. The next phase will be to allow visitors on my client's site to
> > respond to blog comments from that web site.
> >
> >
> >
> > While I am not concerned about the server-side stuff, I have not been
> able
> > to find a way to apply accessibility to this project. It seems to me that
> > the content authors that will be creating the blog in the first place,
> must
> > use proper heading levels and all that good stuff. There isn't anything
> > programmatic that my client's developers can do to ensure that imported
> > content conforms to WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines.
> >
> >
> >
> > Has anyone worked on something like that in the past? Are there any PHP
> or
> > add-ins that can be used to automate the process to achieve a better A11Y
> > access? I know quite well that not all WCAG guidelines can be automated.
> > Many require manual testing. Yet, if we can automate, whichever
> guidelines
> > we can, that will definitely help the page.
> >
> >
> >
> > Any feedback or articles are greatly appreciated.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --------------------
> >
> > JP Jamous
> >
> > Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer
> >
> > <mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > E-Mail Me | <http://linkedin.com/in/JPJamous>;
> Join
> > My LinkedIn Network
> >
> > --------------------
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >

From: JP Jamous
Date: Mon, Jun 10 2019 6:18AM
Subject: Re: WordPress Accessibility
← Previous message | Next message →

Thank you Graham. This is actually the route I was going to suggest. Training the content authors to be more aware of a basic checklist.



--------------------
JP Jamous
Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer
E-Mail Me |Join My LinkedIn Network
--------------------


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > On Behalf Of Graham Armfield
Sent: Monday, June 10, 2019 3:12 AM
To: WebAIM Discussion List < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] WordPress Accessibility

Maybe slightly tangential to the discussion, but there is a new(ish) WordPress plugin that can help content editors and authors deliver accessible content within a WordPress site.

The plugin is called Content Author Accessibility Preview and it can be found at:
https://wordpress.org/plugins/content-author-accessibility-preview/

The plugin is still in its infancy and there is still lots to do.
Improvements are being worked on, but the idea is to flag up potential acessibility issues whenever a user uses the 'Preview' functionality in the content editor. It can also work in the Customiser also.

Feel free to suggest enhancements via GitHub at:
https://github.com/boswall/Content-Author-Accessibility-Preview/issues


Regards
Graham Armfield

coolfields.co.uk <http://www.coolfields.co.uk/>;
M:07905 590026
T: 01483 856613



On Mon, 10 Jun 2019 at 00:53, Chanel Carlascio < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Yes, thank you for making that clear Amanda. I didn’t mean to imply
> that all that would be needed would be the themes and/or the plug-in.
> It might help resolve some aspects of what is going on, but certainly not all of it.
> I have used accessible themes/plug-ins in the past, and while they
> help - they still required a lot of work to meet the standards.
>
>
> On June 9, 2019 at 3:36:06 PM, Amanda J. Rush
> ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = )
> wrote:
>
> Themes can address some of this to a certain extent, but accessibility
> ready themes from the WordPress repo are still dependent on content
> being entered accessibly for the most part. There's no way to slap a
> theme and plugins together as part of a WordPress installation and get
> accessible sites without the authors creating accessible content. The
> devs on the non-WordPress sites could grab the content via the rest
> API and then mark it up on the non-WordPress sites, but they'll
> probably need at least some custom endpoints to make that work if
> they're dealing with any custom post types along with the standard
> posts. Otherwise, it's all down to the authors and then the WordPress
> site being accessible itself.
>
>
> Amanda
>
>
>
> On 6/9/2019 5:36 PM, Chanel Carlascio wrote:
> > I am not sure if this will help you, but I did find a number of
> > Wordpress plugins that claim to address accessibility:
> >
> > https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/accessibility/
> >
> > And a number of themes that claim to be accessible:
> > https://wordpress.org/themes/tags/accessibility-ready/
> >
> > I’d love to hear if any of these are a good work around for you.
> >
> >
> >
> > On June 9, 2019 at 1:45:11 PM, JP Jamous ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ) wrote:
> >
> > Hi folks,
> >
> >
> >
> > I have a unique situation. There is a WordPress blog running on ServerX.
> I
> > have a client who wants to have access to that blog and show it on
> > his
> web
> > site. His web site uses ServerY.
> >
> >
> >
> > While ServerY does not run WordPress at all, developers decided to
> > use a PHP function that would retrieve the page from the WordPress
> > database. They will then show it on a particular page on ServerY,
> > because it would be all of the HTML/text of that blog.
> >
> >
> >
> > 1. Users on ServerX can create their own blogs and they drag and
> > drop all type of content. WCAG is not included at all. For example
> > all of the headings could be H1s.
> > 2. Whenever they create that blog, the blog is pages are saved to
> > the WordPress database.
> > 3. The first attempt for my client's developers is to grab the blog
> > content and show it on my client's web site, which runs Apache only.
> > 4. The next phase will be to allow visitors on my client's site to
> > respond to blog comments from that web site.
> >
> >
> >
> > While I am not concerned about the server-side stuff, I have not
> > been
> able
> > to find a way to apply accessibility to this project. It seems to me
> > that the content authors that will be creating the blog in the first
> > place,
> must
> > use proper heading levels and all that good stuff. There isn't
> > anything programmatic that my client's developers can do to ensure
> > that imported content conforms to WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines.
> >
> >
> >
> > Has anyone worked on something like that in the past? Are there any
> > PHP
> or
> > add-ins that can be used to automate the process to achieve a better
> > A11Y access? I know quite well that not all WCAG guidelines can be automated.
> > Many require manual testing. Yet, if we can automate, whichever
> guidelines
> > we can, that will definitely help the page.
> >
> >
> >
> > Any feedback or articles are greatly appreciated.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --------------------
> >
> > JP Jamous
> >
> > Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer
> >
> > <mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > E-Mail Me |
> > <http://linkedin.com/in/JPJamous>;
> Join
> > My LinkedIn Network
> >
> > --------------------
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > > > > > archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> > > > > > > > archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> > > > > archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> > > > archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> >

From: JP Jamous
Date: Mon, Jun 10 2019 6:21AM
Subject: Re: WordPress Accessibility
← Previous message | No next message

--------------------
JP Jamous
Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer
E-Mail Me |Join My LinkedIn Network
--------------------Thank you all. I figured it was going to be down to those 2 items.

1. Educating the content authors on how to create a more accessible blog using a checklist
Using some type of add-on to help automate the process

Your input is greatly appreciated.


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > On Behalf Of Chanel Carlascio
Sent: Sunday, June 9, 2019 6:54 PM
To: Amanda J. Rush < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >; WebAIM Discussion List < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] WordPress Accessibility

Yes, thank you for making that clear Amanda. I didn’t mean to imply that all that would be needed would be the themes and/or the plug-in. It might help resolve some aspects of what is going on, but certainly not all of it.
I have used accessible themes/plug-ins in the past, and while they help - they still required a lot of work to meet the standards.


On June 9, 2019 at 3:36:06 PM, Amanda J. Rush ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = )
wrote:

Themes can address some of this to a certain extent, but accessibility ready themes from the WordPress repo are still dependent on content being entered accessibly for the most part. There's no way to slap a theme and plugins together as part of a WordPress installation and get accessible sites without the authors creating accessible content. The devs on the non-WordPress sites could grab the content via the rest API and then mark it up on the non-WordPress sites, but they'll probably need at least some custom endpoints to make that work if they're dealing with any custom post types along with the standard posts. Otherwise, it's all down to the authors and then the WordPress site being accessible itself.


Amanda



On 6/9/2019 5:36 PM, Chanel Carlascio wrote:
> I am not sure if this will help you, but I did find a number of
> Wordpress plugins that claim to address accessibility:
>
> https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/accessibility/
>
> And a number of themes that claim to be accessible:
> https://wordpress.org/themes/tags/accessibility-ready/
>
> I’d love to hear if any of these are a good work around for you.
>
>
>
> On June 9, 2019 at 1:45:11 PM, JP Jamous ( = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ) wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
>
>
>
> I have a unique situation. There is a WordPress blog running on
> ServerX. I have a client who wants to have access to that blog and
> show it on his web site. His web site uses ServerY.
>
>
>
> While ServerY does not run WordPress at all, developers decided to use
> a PHP function that would retrieve the page from the WordPress
> database. They will then show it on a particular page on ServerY,
> because it would be all of the HTML/text of that blog.
>
>
>
> 1. Users on ServerX can create their own blogs and they drag and drop
> all type of content. WCAG is not included at all. For example all of
> the headings could be H1s.
> 2. Whenever they create that blog, the blog is pages are saved to the
> WordPress database.
> 3. The first attempt for my client's developers is to grab the blog
> content and show it on my client's web site, which runs Apache only.
> 4. The next phase will be to allow visitors on my client's site to
> respond to blog comments from that web site.
>
>
>
> While I am not concerned about the server-side stuff, I have not been
> able to find a way to apply accessibility to this project. It seems to
> me that the content authors that will be creating the blog in the
> first place,
must
> use proper heading levels and all that good stuff. There isn't
> anything programmatic that my client's developers can do to ensure
> that imported content conforms to WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines.
>
>
>
> Has anyone worked on something like that in the past? Are there any
> PHP or add-ins that can be used to automate the process to achieve a
> better A11Y access? I know quite well that not all WCAG guidelines can be automated.
> Many require manual testing. Yet, if we can automate, whichever
> guidelines we can, that will definitely help the page.
>
>
>
> Any feedback or articles are greatly appreciated.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --------------------
>
> JP Jamous
>
> Senior Digital Accessibility Engineer
>
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