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Thread: Does a charity count as public sector - in terms of the Equality Act?

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From: Jim Byrne Accessible Web Design
Date: Fri, Jul 31 2020 3:17AM
Subject: Does a charity count as public sector - in terms of the Equality Act?
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Hi,

I’ve been asked by a Scottish charity if they fall within the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018?

From what I can tell they have been given government/public sector money do specific pieces of work. They are not sure if that means they are subject to the September deadlines for getting their websites accessible.

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

Thanks,
Jim





About Jim Byrne
With over two decades of experience Jim Byrne is one of the UK’s most experienced practitioners in the area of accessible web design. Jim provided feedback during the development of WCAG 2 as part of the Guild of Accessible Website Designers. He is the author of a number of technical books, training courses and accessibility guides. Jim was a winner of the equal access category of the Global Bangemann Challenge.

Jim Byrne: Specialist in Accessible Website Design.

Web: http://www.jimbyrne.co.uk

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/jimbyrnewebdev

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thirdsectorwebsitedevelopment

From:
Date: Fri, Jul 31 2020 3:44AM
Subject: Re: Does a charity count as public sector - in terms of the Equality Act?
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Jim,

The Equality Act mentioned in your email subject line covers all
sectors, so a charity certainly has obligations under that bit of
legislation (and has done since 2010, or 1995 if you count its
predecessor the Disability Discrimination Act).

Under the Public Sector Accessibility Regulations you mention in your
actual email, if the charity has received public funding (and government
funding qualifies), then they also need to meet the deadlines imposed by
that legislation. There is more information about the Public Sector
Accessibility Regulations here:
https://tetralogical.com/articles/public-sector-accessibility-regulations/

Hope this helps.
Léonie.



On 31/07/2020 10:17, Jim Byrne Accessible Web Design wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I’ve been asked by a Scottish charity if they fall within the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018?
>
> From what I can tell they have been given government/public sector money do specific pieces of work. They are not sure if that means they are subject to the September deadlines for getting their websites accessible.
>
> Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
>
> Thanks,
> Jim
>
>
>
>
>
> About Jim Byrne
> With over two decades of experience Jim Byrne is one of the UK’s most experienced practitioners in the area of accessible web design. Jim provided feedback during the development of WCAG 2 as part of the Guild of Accessible Website Designers. He is the author of a number of technical books, training courses and accessibility guides. Jim was a winner of the equal access category of the Global Bangemann Challenge.
>
> Jim Byrne: Specialist in Accessible Website Design.
>
> Web: http://www.jimbyrne.co.uk
>
> Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/jimbyrnewebdev
>
> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thirdsectorwebsitedevelopment
>
>
>
> > > > >

--
Director @TetraLogical
https://tetralogical.com

From: Steve Green
Date: Fri, Jul 31 2020 3:48AM
Subject: Re: Does a charity count as public sector - in terms of the Equality Act?
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We have had a lot of enquiries from charities who have been advised that they come under the PSBAR because of the amount of public sector funding they receive. The regulations at https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2018/952/made state:



“public sector body” means—

(a) the State;

(b) regional or local authorities;

(c) bodies governed by public law; or

(d) associations formed by one or more of the authorities in paragraph (b) or one or more of the bodies in paragraph (c), if those associations are established for the specific purpose of meeting needs in the general interest, not having an industrial or commercial character;



and



“bodies governed by public law” means bodies that have all of the following characteristics—

(a) they are established for the specific purpose of meeting needs in the general interest, not having an industrial or commercial character;

(b) they have legal personality; and

(c) they have any of the following characteristics—

(i) they are financed, for the most part, by the State, regional or local authorities, or by other bodies governed by public law;

(ii) they are subject to management supervision by those authorities or bodies;

(iii) they have an administrative, managerial or supervisory board, more than half of whose members are appointed by the State, regional or local authorities, or by other bodies governed by public law;



It all hinges on the phrases (i), (ii) and (iii). If they meet any one of those, the regulations apply.



They should know if (ii) or (iii) apply, and it should not be difficult for them to work out if more than 50% of their annual funding comes from the State, regional or local authorities, or by other bodies governed by public law.



Steve Green

Managing Director

Test Partners Ltd





-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > On Behalf Of Jim Byrne Accessible Web Design
Sent: 31 July 2020 10:18
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Subject: [WebAIM] Does a charity count as public sector - in terms of the Equality Act?



Hi,



I’ve been asked by a Scottish charity if they fall within the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018?



From what I can tell they have been given government/public sector money do specific pieces of work. They are not sure if that means they are subject to the September deadlines for getting their websites accessible.



Does anyone have any thoughts on this?



Thanks,

Jim











About Jim Byrne

With over two decades of experience Jim Byrne is one of the UK’s most experienced practitioners in the area of accessible web design. Jim provided feedback during the development of WCAG 2 as part of the Guild of Accessible Website Designers. He is the author of a number of technical books, training courses and accessibility guides. Jim was a winner of the equal access category of the Global Bangemann Challenge.



Jim Byrne: Specialist in Accessible Website Design.



Web: http://www.jimbyrne.co.uk



Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/jimbyrnewebdev



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thirdsectorwebsitedevelopment