Newsletter Archives - April 2006

Note

This newsletter is maintained here for archival purposes. The content presented here may be outdated, may contain out-of-date links, and may not represent current best practices or represent the opinion and recommendations of WebAIM. For up-to-date information, please refer to the WebAIM web site.

Featured Article

Web Accessibility Policies (and Pseudo Policies) in Postsecondary Institutions
by WebAIM

This updated list represents a broad sampling of web accessibility policies across the United States and other regions around the world. Many of these policies can be more accurately described as suggestions, since many institutions do not have any binding formal policy. See how your web accessibility policy compares, or use these as a springboard to create your own.

Read the full article: Web Accessibility Policies (and Pseudo Policies) in Postsecondary Institutions

On Target News

National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS) Website Updated

The following parts of the NIMAS website have been updated:

Book: Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing

Adam Greenfield's book: Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing, was recently published. Read more from: zeldman.com, alistapart.com.

On Target Tips

Accessible CSS Forms: Using CSS to Create a Two-Column Layout
by Andy King, websiteoptimization.com

Websites have become less accessible and more complex over time according to recent studies. Learn how to beat the trend by creating fast, accessible CSS forms that work with modern browsers and gracefully degrade. More about form accessibility using different techniques, from Gez Lemon: Greasemonkey Form Help.

On Target Resources

Accessibility Color Wheel
by Giacomo Mazzocato

This tool analyzes the contrast of a color pair and shows how color-blind people see it. It simulates three kinds of vision deficiencies: deuteranopia, protanope, and tritanope.

Levels of Accessibility
by Mike Cherim, accessites.org

Mike Cherim poses the following questions: Is a site's accessibility really black and white? Can a site's accessibility be answered by a simple yes or no? Are there no gray areas? Are there no levels of accessibility?

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