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Re: Transitions causing motion sickness - WCAG failure and how to handle?

for

From: Karl Brown
Date: Dec 22, 2016 3:21AM


Thanks, everyone.

I'm going to sit with the designers and the brand team at the client and
make some recommendations, including a tool to switch off transitions and
animations (though this won't affect the YouTube videos they'll have).

I'm also going to start doing some deeper work on motion design to see what
guidance can be given more widely to minimise (hopefully eliminate) the
impact the transitions could have.

Thanks again :)

On Wed, Dec 21, 2016 at 2:17 PM, < <EMAIL REMOVED> >
wrote:

> I haven't seen this article shared yet, and I've found that it really
> resonates with designers.
>
> http://alistapart.com/article/designing-safer-web-animation-
> for-motion-sensitivity
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: <EMAIL REMOVED> ] On
> Behalf Of Birkir R. Gunnarsson
> Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2016 7:33 AM
> To: WebAIM Discussion List
> Subject: Re: [WebAIM] Transitions causing motion sickness - WCAG failure
> and how to handle?
>
> Here are a couple of resources I noted on my TWitter feed:
> REduced motion setting in WebKit
> https://github.com/w3c/csswg-drafts/issues/442
> Helpful twitter user:
> https://twitter.com/nattarnoff/status/788154206867849216
> I am curious myself to see how these are coming along.
>
> On 12/21/16, Tim Harshbarger < <EMAIL REMOVED> > wrote:
> > I think the best approach is to provide the client with information
> > and let them decide how they want to proceed.
> >
> > You could just tell them that you experienced motion sickness from the
> > transition. Another option is to try out the transition on other
> > people or propose they try it out on a wider potential audience before
> > they start incorporating the transition into their design more widely.
> > A last option I can think of is to do some research on visually
> > induced motion sickness and perhaps something in that research is
> > something you can explain to the client to give them more information.
> >
> > I am totally blind myself so I have never experienced this. However, I
> > do have family and friends who have complained in the past about
> > visually induced motion sickness--typically after watching 3D films or
> > playing video games. That makes me think that this kind of effect is
> > likely significant enough that someone somewhere might have written
> > about the causes. If you can find that, it might help you explain why
> > the transition could cause motion sickness to other people as
> > well--and possibly provide solutions for how to avoid that effect.
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: <EMAIL REMOVED> ] On
> > Behalf Of Jonathan Cohn
> > Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2016 7:08 AM
> > To: WebAIM Discussion List < <EMAIL REMOVED> >
> > Subject: Re: [WebAIM] Transitions causing motion sickness - WCAG
> > failure and how to handle?
> >
> > I have never seen any standards on this, but during the beta cycle of
> > iPhone's IOS 8 or 9, Apple added in a reduce transitions or animations
> > to their accessibility page. Also, on my Company's IntraNet adjacent
> > to the Enable more accessible mode is a check box to turn off
> > animations. I expect there is no universal way of disabling this
> > based on browser or system preferences.
> >
> > Best wishes,
> >
> > Jonathan Cohn
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Dec 21, 2016, at 6:22 AM, Karl Brown < <EMAIL REMOVED> > wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi all,
> >>
> >> A client is going through a rebranding exercise and as part of that
> >> wants to use lots of animated transitions. The biggest once I've seen
> >> is a right-to-left "swipe" which starts slow, speeds up (a lot) and
> >> slows right down. The transitions will be used in videos and to
> >> switch between "states"
> >> (showing/hiding content which itself slides in at a different rate to
> >> the "block" it sits on).
> >>
> >> While reviewing the document and checking the design agency are
> >> proposing I started to feel symptoms of motion sickness. I'm not
> >> personally prone to motion sickness so I'm assuming the animated
> >> transitions are likely to cause issues for a much wider group of
> >> people.
> >>
> >> Looking through the WCAG I can't see anything that talks about
> >> transitions, motion sickness, or anything similar. The closest I can
> >> find is 2.3.1 but that's about seizures and is closer to epilepsy
> >> than motion sickness.
> >>
> >> Does anyone know of an interpretation that can cover transitions?
> >>
> >> If not, how does the group suggest handling the situation? My concern
> >> for the client is they lose customers because people don't want to
> >> visit a website that makes them feel sick. I don't know enough about
> >> sensory disorders to know whether to speed up/slow down/eliminate the
> >> transitions (the latter won't go down well with the brand team at the
> client).
> >>
> >> All the best,
> >>
> >> --
> >> Karl Brown
> >> Twitter: @kbdevelops
> >> Skype: kbdevelopment
> >>
> >> Professional Certificate Web Accessibility Compliance (Distinction),
> >> University of South Australia, 2015
> >> > >> > >> archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> >> > >
> > > > > > archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> > > > > > > > archives at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> > > >
>
>
> --
> Work hard. Have fun. Make history.
> > > at http://webaim.org/discussion/archives
> > > > > >



--
Karl Brown
Twitter: @kbdevelops
Skype: kbdevelopment

Professional Certificate Web Accessibility Compliance (Distinction),
University of South Australia, 2015