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Re: JAWS Screen Reader (and Word)

for

From: Jon Gunderson
Date: Oct 12, 2006 6:20AM


The Illinois Accessible Web Publishing WIzard is designed to create accessible web versions of Microsoft Office documents.

http://www.accessiblewizards.uiuc.edu

Jon


---- Original message ----
>Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2006 11:32:53 +0100
>From: Joshue O Connor < <EMAIL REMOVED> >
>Subject: Re: [WebAIM] JAWS Screen Reader (and Word)
>To: WebAIM Discussion List < <EMAIL REMOVED> >
>
>
>> I believe the best way to assist
>> visually-impaired readers of Word documents would be to use the
>> same principles of applying structured markup (identifying headings,
>> lists, tables, etc.) as is recommended for HTML.
>
>Eoin is right. Also if structural documents are created in Word they can
>then
>be exported (problems with MS HTML not withstanding) as fairly
>accessible HTML docs.
>
>Josh
>
>Eoin Campbell wrote:
>> I'm not a JAWS expert, but I believe the best way to assist
>> visually-impaired readers of Word documents would be to use the
>> same principles of applying structured markup (identifying headings,
>> lists, tables, etc.) as is recommended for HTML.
>>
>> Word has plenty of built-in styles such as Heading 1, Heading 2, List Bullet,
>> which can be used to apply structure to a document.
>> JAWS can use these structure styles to assist readers in navigating around
>> the document.
>> Using named styles consistently will also allow users apply their own
>> preferred Word template (with larger fonts, for example), so that they can
>> view it in a way that suits them.
>>
>>
>> "DONALD WONNELL" < <EMAIL REMOVED> > wrote:
>>
>>> Is there any way to emphasize certain points on a Word document written
>>> in textonly for the visually challenged audience? Don't want to have
>>> unusually burdensome text for people to have to access.
>>>
>>> Heard underlining or bold text makes it harder for JAWS to read in some
>>> versions, in others has no effect so there would be no advantage to
>>> using it. At one time all caps was said to be easier for screen readers
>>> to pick up. Please give me any info you may have on this.
>>
>>
>
>
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Jon Gunderson, Ph.D.
Director of IT Accessibility Services
Campus Information Technologies and Educational Services (CITES)
and
Coordinator of Assistive Communication and Information Technology
Disability Resources and Education Services (DRES)

Voice: (217) 244-5870
Fax: (217) 333-0248
Cell: (217) 714-6313

E-mail: <EMAIL REMOVED>

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