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Thread: Word/PDF accessibility guide

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Number of posts in this thread: 18 (In chronological order)

From: Terzian, Sharon
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 4:08AM
Subject: Word/PDF accessibility guide
No previous message | Next message →

Hi
I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it a PDF.

I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't always go well.

I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance barely know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be hands on (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of tables for layouts.

I know Word inside and out, but
because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can barely spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've tried to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in charge), I'm not even overly
familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My expertise is web design.

Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the WebAIM documents), please suggest away.

Thanks.

Sharon Terzian
Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
http://www.sherlockcenter.org
http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net

From: L Snider
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:03AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi Sharon,

Are you looking for sample docs to use, or online materials about Word
accessibility tips? I just wanted to confirm...

Cheers

Lisa



On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 5:08 AM, Terzian, Sharon < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Hi
> I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro
> active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it
> a PDF.
>
> I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of
> it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't
> always go well.
>
> I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance barely
> know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be hands on
> (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of tables for
> layouts.
>
> I know Word inside and out, but
> because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can barely
> spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've tried
> to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in charge),
> I'm not even overly
> familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best
> thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about
> the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My
> expertise is web design.
>
> Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the
> WebAIM documents), please suggest away.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sharon Terzian
> Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
> Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
> http://www.sherlockcenter.org
> http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net
> > > > > >

From: Duff Johnson
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:22AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi Sharon,

If they barely know Word at all, these would be my “top 5” tips in terms of where to focus...

1. Train them - with religious fervor - to use Styles, and to avoid inline styling to the extent possible.

2. While on the above subject, train them to use headings to structure the document properly. This practice may also help them to think logically, and could help them in presenting their ideas in general...

3. Ensure they provide alt. text for figures and graphics.

4. Ensure they do not rely on color contrast in graphs and charts, and preferably, to provide a tabular version of the information presented in each chart / graph.

5. Train them to be sure to use PDF creation software which produces “tagged PDF”.

That’s my $0.02 for today!

Duff.



> On Feb 22, 2016, at 06:08, Terzian, Sharon < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Hi
> I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it a PDF.
>
> I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't always go well.
>
> I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance barely know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be hands on (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of tables for layouts.
>
> I know Word inside and out, but
> because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can barely spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've tried to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in charge), I'm not even overly
> familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My expertise is web design.
>
> Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the WebAIM documents), please suggest away.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sharon Terzian
> Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
> Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
> http://www.sherlockcenter.org
> http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net
> > > > >

From: Terzian, Sharon
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:24AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Thank you. They know how to type. That doesn't make them Word proficient. Something my regular students find out the hard way. But this isn't graded, just in service.

sent by flying monkeys through cyberspace



On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 7:22 AM -0800, "Duff Johnson" < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = <mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >> wrote:

Hi Sharon,

If they barely know Word at all, these would be my “top 5” tips in terms of where to focus...

1. Train them - with religious fervor - to use Styles, and to avoid inline styling to the extent possible.

2. While on the above subject, train them to use headings to structure the document properly. This practice may also help them to think logically, and could help them in presenting their ideas in general...

3. Ensure they provide alt. text for figures and graphics.

4. Ensure they do not rely on color contrast in graphs and charts, and preferably, to provide a tabular version of the information presented in each chart / graph.

5. Train them to be sure to use PDF creation software which produces “tagged PDF”.

That’s my $0.02 for today!

Duff.



> On Feb 22, 2016, at 06:08, Terzian, Sharon < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Hi
> I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it a PDF.
>
> I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't always go well.
>
> I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance barely know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be hands on (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of tables for layouts.
>
> I know Word inside and out, but
> because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can barely spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've tried to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in charge), I'm not even overly
> familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My expertise is web design.
>
> Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the WebAIM documents), please suggest away.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sharon Terzian
> Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
> Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
> http://www.sherlockcenter.org
> http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net
> > > > >

From: Andrew Kirkpatrick
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:33AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Years ago we had a one-page (two sides) document that highlighted a few key points to consider in Word to avoid many accessibility issues. The advise was similar to Duff’s, but it focused a lot on the importance of using Word’s functionality to convey document structure correctly. Things like alt for images, using headings, creating tables/lists/hyperlinks/columns with Word’s tools (rather than mocking these up in any way), etc.

And of course, making sure that tagged PDF is created.

In my experience I would spend a good chunk of time teaching people how to use styles correctly. It not only saves time, but enhances accessibility.

Thanks,
AWK

Andrew Kirkpatrick
Group Product Manager, Accessibility
Adobe

= EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
http://twitter.com/awkawk
http://blogs.adobe.com/accessibility








On 2/22/16, 10:24, "WebAIM-Forum on behalf of Terzian, Sharon" < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = on behalf of = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

>Thank you. They know how to type. That doesn't make them Word proficient. Something my regular students find out the hard way. But this isn't graded, just in service.
>
>sent by flying monkeys through cyberspace
>
>
>
>On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 7:22 AM -0800, "Duff Johnson" < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = <mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >> wrote:
>
>Hi Sharon,
>
>If they barely know Word at all, these would be my “top 5” tips in terms of where to focus...
>
>1. Train them - with religious fervor - to use Styles, and to avoid inline styling to the extent possible.
>
>2. While on the above subject, train them to use headings to structure the document properly. This practice may also help them to think logically, and could help them in presenting their ideas in general...
>
>3. Ensure they provide alt. text for figures and graphics.
>
>4. Ensure they do not rely on color contrast in graphs and charts, and preferably, to provide a tabular version of the information presented in each chart / graph.
>
>5. Train them to be sure to use PDF creation software which produces “tagged PDF”.
>
>That’s my $0.02 for today!
>
>Duff.
>
>
>
>> On Feb 22, 2016, at 06:08, Terzian, Sharon < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>>
>> Hi
>> I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it a PDF.
>>
>> I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't always go well.
>>
>> I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance barely know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be hands on (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of tables for layouts.
>>
>> I know Word inside and out, but
>> because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can barely spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've tried to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in charge), I'm not even overly
>> familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My expertise is web design.
>>
>> Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the WebAIM documents), please suggest away.
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Sharon Terzian
>> Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
>> Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
>> http://www.sherlockcenter.org
>> http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net
>> >> >> >> >> >
>
>>>>>>>>

From: L Snider
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 8:45AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

I would also add that it is important to add in things for people with
cognitive disabilities. This has been left out of a lot of the guides out
there.

It is pretty standard stuff, like use white space, keep your margins at a
'normal' level if you can, try to keep consistent fonts, sizes, don't crowd
the page, etc.

Basically it all makes the document more usable, as well as accessible.

Cheers

Lisa

On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 9:33 AM, Andrew Kirkpatrick < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
wrote:

> Years ago we had a one-page (two sides) document that highlighted a few
> key points to consider in Word to avoid many accessibility issues. The
> advise was similar to Duff’s, but it focused a lot on the importance of
> using Word’s functionality to convey document structure correctly. Things
> like alt for images, using headings, creating
> tables/lists/hyperlinks/columns with Word’s tools (rather than mocking
> these up in any way), etc.
>
> And of course, making sure that tagged PDF is created.
>
> In my experience I would spend a good chunk of time teaching people how to
> use styles correctly. It not only saves time, but enhances accessibility.
>
> Thanks,
> AWK
>
> Andrew Kirkpatrick
> Group Product Manager, Accessibility
> Adobe
>
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
> http://twitter.com/awkawk
> http://blogs.adobe.com/accessibility
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 2/22/16, 10:24, "WebAIM-Forum on behalf of Terzian, Sharon" <
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = on behalf of = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> >Thank you. They know how to type. That doesn't make them Word
> proficient. Something my regular students find out the hard way. But this
> isn't graded, just in service.
> >
> >sent by flying monkeys through cyberspace
> >
> >
> >
> >On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 7:22 AM -0800, "Duff Johnson" <
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = <mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >> wrote:
> >
> >Hi Sharon,
> >
> >If they barely know Word at all, these would be my “top 5” tips in terms
> of where to focus...
> >
> >1. Train them - with religious fervor - to use Styles, and to avoid
> inline styling to the extent possible.
> >
> >2. While on the above subject, train them to use headings to structure
> the document properly. This practice may also help them to think logically,
> and could help them in presenting their ideas in general...
> >
> >3. Ensure they provide alt. text for figures and graphics.
> >
> >4. Ensure they do not rely on color contrast in graphs and charts, and
> preferably, to provide a tabular version of the information presented in
> each chart / graph.
> >
> >5. Train them to be sure to use PDF creation software which produces
> “tagged PDF”.
> >
> >That’s my $0.02 for today!
> >
> >Duff.
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Feb 22, 2016, at 06:08, Terzian, Sharon < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi
> >> I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro
> active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it
> a PDF.
> >>
> >> I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of
> it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't
> always go well.
> >>
> >> I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance
> barely know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be
> hands on (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of
> tables for layouts.
> >>
> >> I know Word inside and out, but
> >> because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can
> barely spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've
> tried to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in
> charge), I'm not even overly
> >> familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best
> thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about
> the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My
> expertise is web design.
> >>
> >> Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the
> WebAIM documents), please suggest away.
> >>
> >> Thanks.
> >>
> >> Sharon Terzian
> >> Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
> >> Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
> >> http://www.sherlockcenter.org
> >> http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net
> >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > >
> >
> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> > > > >

From: Jim Allan
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 11:11AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Sharon,
check out http://gov.texas.gov/disabilities/accessibledocs
a toolbar/ribbon to with word tools that create accessible content all in
one place with training materials, video, audio, etc.


On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 5:08 AM, Terzian, Sharon < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Hi
> I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro
> active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it
> a PDF.
>
> I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of
> it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't
> always go well.
>
> I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance barely
> know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be hands on
> (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of tables for
> layouts.
>
> I know Word inside and out, but
> because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can barely
> spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've tried
> to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in charge),
> I'm not even overly
> familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best
> thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about
> the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My
> expertise is web design.
>
> Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the
> WebAIM documents), please suggest away.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sharon Terzian
> Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
> Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
> http://www.sherlockcenter.org
> http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net
> > > > > >



--
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
voice 512.206.9315 fax: 512.206.9264 http://www.tsbvi.edu/
"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964

From: Cliff Tyllick
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 11:13AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

For several years, the Texas Governor's Committee on People with Disabilities has maintained a set of tutorials on creating accessible documents in Microsoft Word 2010:
http://gov.texas.gov/disabilities/accessibledocs

These tutorials are based on using the Productivity tab (originally called the Accessibility tab; many of us switched to calling it Productivity when we realized the DAISY Consortium had created their own Accessibility tab to optimize use of their reader with Word). When followed, they produce Word documents that have the features needed to create PDFs that are almost fully accessible. (No matter how well you build the Word document, there always seem to be a few things to clean up in the PDF. In particular, tables can be made much more accessible in PDF than is possible in Word.)

Our Productivity tab was developed from our Accessibility toolbar for Word 2003, the first interface I am aware of that includes only commands that support the creation of accessible documents. Changing the interface to ensure that authors and editors have ready access to commands that support accessibility is essential. And it's as important to get rid of the electronic equivalent of kindergarten tools—the different-colored crayons, the fatter markers, the safety scissors, and the pot of paste—that are so easy to use but cause the document to be inaccessible.

We have just started working on updating these tutorials. If you have any suggestions for improving them (I know they're not perfect; your comments will help us make sure errors don't get repeated), please send them to me and to Mike Moore, who also regularly participates in this forum.

Our tab and instructions for installing it are available with the tutorials for free. You may also freely modify this tab to remove features that you don't need and add others that you do.

Vision Australia has created a product called the Document Accessibility Toolbar, which must be installed as a template:
https://www.visionaustralia.org/business-and-professionals/digital-access-consulting/resources/document-accessibility-toolbar

Their toolbar (actually a tab in Word's ribbon, named Accessibility) has a number of features I like. For one, it can export Word to clean HTML, so the people who contribute content to your website can write with Word and the developer can quickly load the content as HTML. (Oddly enough, although the macro correctly changes italicized text to <em> and bold text to <strong>, it strips out the Word styles of Emphasis and Strong, rendering that content as unformatted text. But it is a beta, and they, too, are eager for your suggestions for improving it.)

Although the beta version of the Document Accessibility Toolbar is being distributed for free, you must also get a license—either a single-user license or a multi-user license. When asked, they insisted that we not modify this tab to add features our authors need. Your results may vary.

Both of these tools are based on the same concepts:
• No matter how poorly it actually works, people will use a tool that is easy to find.
• No matter how much they need the results that only it can provide, people generally will not use a tool that they cannot easily find.
• Once people find a toolkit that seems to work okay, they rarely if ever try to find tools it lacks.

Late last year I emailed Microsoft's Accessibility team about the need to provide this kind of an interface as one of the standard tabs in Word. (I'd call it the Professional tab so even people who know nothing about accessibility would use it.) I need to follow up with them, because I have had no response. Maybe if they hear the same request from many different people they will respond.

If you'd like to collaborate in this effort, please contact me. I will be at CSUN, so maybe we could find time to discuss and plan there.

Cliff Tyllick
Accessibility Specialist
Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services
512-377-0366

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Feb 22, 2016, at 9:45 AM, L Snider < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> johnson

From: L Snider
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 11:24AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Thanks Cliff, great resources.

I would like to know more about trying to get MS to do what you suggest in
terms of the tabs.

Anyone use these with Office 2016?

Cheers

Lisa

On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 12:13 PM, Cliff Tyllick < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> For several years, the Texas Governor's Committee on People with
> Disabilities has maintained a set of tutorials on creating accessible
> documents in Microsoft Word 2010:
> http://gov.texas.gov/disabilities/accessibledocs
>
> These tutorials are based on using the Productivity tab (originally called
> the Accessibility tab; many of us switched to calling it Productivity when
> we realized the DAISY Consortium had created their own Accessibility tab to
> optimize use of their reader with Word). When followed, they produce Word
> documents that have the features needed to create PDFs that are almost
> fully accessible. (No matter how well you build the Word document, there
> always seem to be a few things to clean up in the PDF. In particular,
> tables can be made much more accessible in PDF than is possible in Word.)
>
> Our Productivity tab was developed from our Accessibility toolbar for Word
> 2003, the first interface I am aware of that includes only commands that
> support the creation of accessible documents. Changing the interface to
> ensure that authors and editors have ready access to commands that support
> accessibility is essential. And it's as important to get rid of the
> electronic equivalent of kindergarten tools—the different-colored crayons,
> the fatter markers, the safety scissors, and the pot of paste—that are so
> easy to use but cause the document to be inaccessible.
>
> We have just started working on updating these tutorials. If you have any
> suggestions for improving them (I know they're not perfect; your comments
> will help us make sure errors don't get repeated), please send them to me
> and to Mike Moore, who also regularly participates in this forum.
>
> Our tab and instructions for installing it are available with the
> tutorials for free. You may also freely modify this tab to remove features
> that you don't need and add others that you do.
>
> Vision Australia has created a product called the Document Accessibility
> Toolbar, which must be installed as a template:
>
> https://www.visionaustralia.org/business-and-professionals/digital-access-consulting/resources/document-accessibility-toolbar
>
> Their toolbar (actually a tab in Word's ribbon, named Accessibility) has a
> number of features I like. For one, it can export Word to clean HTML, so
> the people who contribute content to your website can write with Word and
> the developer can quickly load the content as HTML. (Oddly enough, although
> the macro correctly changes italicized text to <em> and bold text to
> <strong>, it strips out the Word styles of Emphasis and Strong, rendering
> that content as unformatted text. But it is a beta, and they, too, are
> eager for your suggestions for improving it.)
>
> Although the beta version of the Document Accessibility Toolbar is being
> distributed for free, you must also get a license—either a single-user
> license or a multi-user license. When asked, they insisted that we not
> modify this tab to add features our authors need. Your results may vary.
>
> Both of these tools are based on the same concepts:
> • No matter how poorly it actually works, people will use a tool that is
> easy to find.
> • No matter how much they need the results that only it can provide,
> people generally will not use a tool that they cannot easily find.
> • Once people find a toolkit that seems to work okay, they rarely if ever
> try to find tools it lacks.
>
> Late last year I emailed Microsoft's Accessibility team about the need to
> provide this kind of an interface as one of the standard tabs in Word. (I'd
> call it the Professional tab so even people who know nothing about
> accessibility would use it.) I need to follow up with them, because I have
> had no response. Maybe if they hear the same request from many different
> people they will respond.
>
> If you'd like to collaborate in this effort, please contact me. I will be
> at CSUN, so maybe we could find time to discuss and plan there.
>
> Cliff Tyllick
> Accessibility Specialist
> Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services
> 512-377-0366
>
>
>

From: Cliff Tyllick
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 11:48AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

We have started trying it out. I haven't used it myself, but if MS hasn't changed the way user settings are saved and applied I see no reason these tabs shouldn't work in it, too.

I've heard nothing discouraging about Office 2016 and the Productivity tab from people who have already upgraded, so maybe it does work just fine. Let me know what you discover!

Cliff

Sent from my iPhone
Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its fault.

> On Feb 22, 2016, at 12:24 PM, L Snider < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> Thanks Cliff, great resources.
>
> I would like to know more about trying to get MS to do what you suggest in
> terms of the tabs.
>
> Anyone use these with Office 2016?
>
> Cheers
>
> Lisa
>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 12:13 PM, Cliff Tyllick < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>>
>> For several years, the Texas Governor's Committee on People with
>> Disabilities has maintained a set of tutorials on creating accessible
>> documents in Microsoft Word 2010:
>> http://gov.texas.gov/disabilities/accessibledocs
>>
>> These tutorials are based on using the Productivity tab (originally called
>> the Accessibility tab; many of us switched to calling it Productivity when
>> we realized the DAISY Consortium had created their own Accessibility tab to
>> optimize use of their reader with Word). When followed, they produce Word
>> documents that have the features needed to create PDFs that are almost
>> fully accessible. (No matter how well you build the Word document, there
>> always seem to be a few things to clean up in the PDF. In particular,
>> tables can be made much more accessible in PDF than is possible in Word.)
>>
>> Our Productivity tab was developed from our Accessibility toolbar for Word
>> 2003, the first interface I am aware of that includes only commands that
>> support the creation of accessible documents. Changing the interface to
>> ensure that authors and editors have ready access to commands that support
>> accessibility is essential. And it's as important to get rid of the
>> electronic equivalent of kindergarten tools—the different-colored crayons,
>> the fatter markers, the safety scissors, and the pot of paste—that are so
>> easy to use but cause the document to be inaccessible.
>>
>> We have just started working on updating these tutorials. If you have any
>> suggestions for improving them (I know they're not perfect; your comments
>> will help us make sure errors don't get repeated), please send them to me
>> and to Mike Moore, who also regularly participates in this forum.
>>
>> Our tab and instructions for installing it are available with the
>> tutorials for free. You may also freely modify this tab to remove features
>> that you don't need and add others that you do.
>>
>> Vision Australia has created a product called the Document Accessibility
>> Toolbar, which must be installed as a template:
>>
>> https://www.visionaustralia.org/business-and-professionals/digital-access-consulting/resources/document-accessibility-toolbar
>>
>> Their toolbar (actually a tab in Word's ribbon, named Accessibility) has a
>> number of features I like. For one, it can export Word to clean HTML, so
>> the people who contribute content to your website can write with Word and
>> the developer can quickly load the content as HTML. (Oddly enough, although
>> the macro correctly changes italicized text to <em> and bold text to
>> <strong>, it strips out the Word styles of Emphasis and Strong, rendering
>> that content as unformatted text. But it is a beta, and they, too, are
>> eager for your suggestions for improving it.)
>>
>> Although the beta version of the Document Accessibility Toolbar is being
>> distributed for free, you must also get a license—either a single-user
>> license or a multi-user license. When asked, they insisted that we not
>> modify this tab to add features our authors need. Your results may vary.
>>
>> Both of these tools are based on the same concepts:
>> • No matter how poorly it actually works, people will use a tool that is
>> easy to find.
>> • No matter how much they need the results that only it can provide,
>> people generally will not use a tool that they cannot easily find.
>> • Once people find a toolkit that seems to work okay, they rarely if ever
>> try to find tools it lacks.
>>
>> Late last year I emailed Microsoft's Accessibility team about the need to
>> provide this kind of an interface as one of the standard tabs in Word. (I'd
>> call it the Professional tab so even people who know nothing about
>> accessibility would use it.) I need to follow up with them, because I have
>> had no response. Maybe if they hear the same request from many different
>> people they will respond.
>>
>> If you'd like to collaborate in this effort, please contact me. I will be
>> at CSUN, so maybe we could find time to discuss and plan there.
>>
>> Cliff Tyllick
>> Accessibility Specialist
>> Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services
>> 512-377-0366
> > > >

From: Ryan E. Benson
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 11:51AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi. I have a few trainings, and one is our 15 minutes version, which skips
all the details about why they need to make their documents accessible, and
just covers the 5 things that they can do to get their doc mostly
accessible. Those are
1 use styles for headings
2 add alt text for images and charts
3 don't use color alone to convey meaning
4 use tables correctly. We often see people use tables versus columns and
sometimes tabs/spaces versus a table
5 group images that are together to make up a larger image.

This is a 8 or 9 slide ppt, which I can do in either a 15, 20, or 30 minute
window

Ryan E. Benson
On Feb 22, 2016 10:24 AM, "L Snider" < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> Thanks Cliff, great resources.
>
> I would like to know more about trying to get MS to do what you suggest in
> terms of the tabs.
>
> Anyone use these with Office 2016?
>
> Cheers
>
> Lisa
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 12:13 PM, Cliff Tyllick < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> > For several years, the Texas Governor's Committee on People with
> > Disabilities has maintained a set of tutorials on creating accessible
> > documents in Microsoft Word 2010:
> > http://gov.texas.gov/disabilities/accessibledocs
> >
> > These tutorials are based on using the Productivity tab (originally
> called
> > the Accessibility tab; many of us switched to calling it Productivity
> when
> > we realized the DAISY Consortium had created their own Accessibility tab
> to
> > optimize use of their reader with Word). When followed, they produce Word
> > documents that have the features needed to create PDFs that are almost
> > fully accessible. (No matter how well you build the Word document, there
> > always seem to be a few things to clean up in the PDF. In particular,
> > tables can be made much more accessible in PDF than is possible in Word.)
> >
> > Our Productivity tab was developed from our Accessibility toolbar for
> Word
> > 2003, the first interface I am aware of that includes only commands that
> > support the creation of accessible documents. Changing the interface to
> > ensure that authors and editors have ready access to commands that
> support
> > accessibility is essential. And it's as important to get rid of the
> > electronic equivalent of kindergarten tools—the different-colored
> crayons,
> > the fatter markers, the safety scissors, and the pot of paste—that are so
> > easy to use but cause the document to be inaccessible.
> >
> > We have just started working on updating these tutorials. If you have any
> > suggestions for improving them (I know they're not perfect; your comments
> > will help us make sure errors don't get repeated), please send them to me
> > and to Mike Moore, who also regularly participates in this forum.
> >
> > Our tab and instructions for installing it are available with the
> > tutorials for free. You may also freely modify this tab to remove
> features
> > that you don't need and add others that you do.
> >
> > Vision Australia has created a product called the Document Accessibility
> > Toolbar, which must be installed as a template:
> >
> >
> https://www.visionaustralia.org/business-and-professionals/digital-access-consulting/resources/document-accessibility-toolbar
> >
> > Their toolbar (actually a tab in Word's ribbon, named Accessibility) has
> a
> > number of features I like. For one, it can export Word to clean HTML, so
> > the people who contribute content to your website can write with Word and
> > the developer can quickly load the content as HTML. (Oddly enough,
> although
> > the macro correctly changes italicized text to <em> and bold text to
> > <strong>, it strips out the Word styles of Emphasis and Strong, rendering
> > that content as unformatted text. But it is a beta, and they, too, are
> > eager for your suggestions for improving it.)
> >
> > Although the beta version of the Document Accessibility Toolbar is being
> > distributed for free, you must also get a license—either a single-user
> > license or a multi-user license. When asked, they insisted that we not
> > modify this tab to add features our authors need. Your results may vary.
> >
> > Both of these tools are based on the same concepts:
> > • No matter how poorly it actually works, people will use a tool that is
> > easy to find.
> > • No matter how much they need the results that only it can provide,
> > people generally will not use a tool that they cannot easily find.
> > • Once people find a toolkit that seems to work okay, they rarely if ever
> > try to find tools it lacks.
> >
> > Late last year I emailed Microsoft's Accessibility team about the need to
> > provide this kind of an interface as one of the standard tabs in Word.
> (I'd
> > call it the Professional tab so even people who know nothing about
> > accessibility would use it.) I need to follow up with them, because I
> have
> > had no response. Maybe if they hear the same request from many different
> > people they will respond.
> >
> > If you'd like to collaborate in this effort, please contact me. I will be
> > at CSUN, so maybe we could find time to discuss and plan there.
> >
> > Cliff Tyllick
> > Accessibility Specialist
> > Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services
> > 512-377-0366
> >
> >
> >
> > > > >

From: L Snider
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 12:06PM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi Cliff,

Good to know, thanks! Will definitely pass along any issues.

Cheers

Lisa

On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 12:48 PM, Cliff Tyllick < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

> We have started trying it out. I haven't used it myself, but if MS hasn't
> changed the way user settings are saved and applied I see no reason these
> tabs shouldn't work in it, too.
>
> I've heard nothing discouraging about Office 2016 and the Productivity tab
> from people who have already upgraded, so maybe it does work just fine. Let
> me know what you discover!
>
> Cliff
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Although its spellcheck often saves me, all goofs in sent messages are its
> fault.
>
> > On Feb 22, 2016, at 12:24 PM, L Snider < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
> >
> > Thanks Cliff, great resources.
> >
> > I would like to know more about trying to get MS to do what you suggest
> in
> > terms of the tabs.
> >
> > Anyone use these with Office 2016?
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> > Lisa
> >
> >
>

From: John E. Brandt
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 12:48PM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

@Sharon, et al...

I've taught a couple of workshops and one webinar on Accessible Digital Documents and maintain that most digital documents start out as word processed documents - or at least they should be.

Here is a link to all of the resources. Feel free to share.

http://mainecite.org/accessible-digital-documents/

I will look at what others have sent to you in this thread, and if I don't have them on this page, I will add them.

BTW, I plan to do this training again in May and will be updating everything soon. If you find any other nuggets, let me know.

~j

John E. Brandt
jebswebs.com

= EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
jebswebs.com


-----Original Message-----
From: WebAIM-Forum [mailto: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Terzian, Sharon
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 6:09 AM
To: WebAIM Discussion List < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = >
Subject: [WebAIM] Word/PDF accessibility guide

Hi
I've been asked to teach a short class to non-techies on how to be pro active as far as Accessibility when using Word and then probably making it a PDF.

I teach Word now and know it has the accessibility checker as a part of it. I also know the challenges when you make it into a PDF, it doesn't always go well.

I found a few things online, but the people that are in attendance barely know Word. Plus I'll need a 'start' file as this training will be hands on (I reserved the lab that I teach in). They tend to use a lot of tables for layouts.

I know Word inside and out, but
because I generally am teaching college students, most of whom can barely spell these days, never mind care about accessibility (and yes I've tried to push and include more of this every semester, but I"m not in charge), I'm not even overly familiar with what can be done. I know and have always said the best thing you can do is plan ahead on your layouts, colors, etc. I know about the headings and hierarchies, I know about tags for photos, etc. My expertise is web design.

Any suggestions or resources you know of (I have already download the WebAIM documents), please suggest away.

Thanks.

Sharon Terzian
Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC http://www.sherlockcenter.org http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net

From: Marinette Fargo
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 1:12PM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

This is great info from everyone!


If any of your students are creating documents on a Mac, please make sure they know that Microsoft Word for the Mac cannot produce a fully accessible PDF. A PDF made from Microsoft Word for the Mac does not retain the structure tags (headings, lists, table headers, etc.) from the original document, so it is difficult for a screen reader user to navigate.

 

A few alternative options for Mac users are:

 

Create your Word document with MS Word for the Mac. Save your document on a thumb drive (or email it to yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows computer open your documents with MS Word and convert them to a PDF.  Make sure to follow the instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS Office for Windows.

 

Download LibreOffice which is a free, open-source office suite similar to MS Office. LibreOffice is probably being used by some of your students because it's free! It can open MS Word documents and can save documents as MS Word documents. And it can create accessible PDFs!

 

Create your word document with iWork's Pages software, export or save it as a .doc file. Save your document on a thumb drive (or email it to yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows computer open your documents with MS Word and convert them to a PDF.  Make sure to follow the instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS Office for Windows.

 

I hope this helps some!

Marinette
----- Original Message -----

From: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
To: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 2:00:01 PM
Subject: WebAIM-Forum Digest, Vol 131, Issue 22

Send WebAIM-Forum mailing list submissions to
         = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
        http://list.webaim.org/mailman/listinfo/webaim-forum
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
         = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

You can reach the person managing the list at
         = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of WebAIM-Forum digest..."

Today's Topics:

   1. Word/PDF accessibility guide (Terzian, Sharon)
   2. Re: Font Icons in Safari (_mallory)
   3. Use of alt text in document tables (Wyant, Jay (MNIT))
   4. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (Jonathan Avila)
   5. Re: Race, Gender, and Other Categories in Alt Text for
      Headshots (Chaals McCathie Nevile)
   6. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
   7. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Duff Johnson)
   8. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Terzian, Sharon)
   9. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Andrew Kirkpatrick)
  10. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
  11. Automated accessibility testing by the blind testers?
      (Ramakrishnan Subramanian)
  12. Re: Automated accessibility testing by the blind testers?
      (Birkir R. Gunnarsson)
  13. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
      (Sailesh Panchang)
  14. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (Jim Allan)
  15. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Jim Allan)
  16. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Cliff Tyllick)
  17. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (L Snider)
  18. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
      (Jonathan Avila)
  19. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
  20. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
      (Jonathan Avila)
  21. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Cliff Tyllick)
  22. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Ryan E. Benson)

--
Library Accessibility Services ,
McLaughlin Library - Room 124
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario
N1G 2W1
Canada
Phone: 519-824-4120 ext. 58925
Fax: 519-836-0435
Office Hours:  8:30am - 4:30pm  (Monday - Friday)
 
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email message, including any attachments, is intended only for the recipient(s). If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy all copies of the original message.

From: Jim Allan
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 1:58PM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

and there is this -
Adobe® Acrobat® X Creating Accessible PDF Files from Microsoft® Word
http://www.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/accessibility/products/acrobat/pdfs/acrobat-x-accessible-pdf-from-word.pdf

On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 2:12 PM, Marinette Fargo < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:

>
>
> This is great info from everyone!
>
>
> If any of your students are creating documents on a Mac, please make sure
> they know that Microsoft Word for the Mac cannot produce a fully accessible
> PDF. A PDF made from Microsoft Word for the Mac does not retain the
> structure tags (headings, lists, table headers, etc.) from the original
> document, so it is difficult for a screen reader user to navigate.
>
>
>
> A few alternative options for Mac users are:
>
>
>
> Create your Word document with MS Word for the Mac. Save your document on
> a thumb drive (or email it to yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows
> computer open your documents with MS Word and convert them to a PDF. Make
> sure to follow the instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS
> Office for Windows.
>
>
>
> Download LibreOffice which is a free, open-source office suite similar to
> MS Office. LibreOffice is probably being used by some of your students
> because it's free! It can open MS Word documents and can save documents as
> MS Word documents. And it can create accessible PDFs!
>
>
>
> Create your word document with iWork's Pages software, export or save it
> as a .doc file. Save your document on a thumb drive (or email it to
> yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows computer open your documents
> with MS Word and convert them to a PDF. Make sure to follow the
> instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS Office for Windows.
>
>
>
> I hope this helps some!
>
> Marinette
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
> To: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 2:00:01 PM
> Subject: WebAIM-Forum Digest, Vol 131, Issue 22
>
> Send WebAIM-Forum mailing list submissions to
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> http://list.webaim.org/mailman/listinfo/webaim-forum
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of WebAIM-Forum digest..."
>
> Today's Topics:
>
> 1. Word/PDF accessibility guide (Terzian, Sharon)
> 2. Re: Font Icons in Safari (_mallory)
> 3. Use of alt text in document tables (Wyant, Jay (MNIT))
> 4. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (Jonathan Avila)
> 5. Re: Race, Gender, and Other Categories in Alt Text for
> Headshots (Chaals McCathie Nevile)
> 6. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
> 7. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Duff Johnson)
> 8. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Terzian, Sharon)
> 9. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Andrew Kirkpatrick)
> 10. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
> 11. Automated accessibility testing by the blind testers?
> (Ramakrishnan Subramanian)
> 12. Re: Automated accessibility testing by the blind testers?
> (Birkir R. Gunnarsson)
> 13. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
> (Sailesh Panchang)
> 14. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (Jim Allan)
> 15. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Jim Allan)
> 16. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Cliff Tyllick)
> 17. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (L Snider)
> 18. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
> (Jonathan Avila)
> 19. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
> 20. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
> (Jonathan Avila)
> 21. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Cliff Tyllick)
> 22. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Ryan E. Benson)
>
> > > > >
>
>
> --
> Library Accessibility Services ,
> McLaughlin Library - Room 124
> University of Guelph
> Guelph, Ontario
> N1G 2W1
> Canada
> Phone: 519-824-4120 ext. 58925
> Fax: 519-836-0435
> Office Hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm (Monday - Friday)
>
> CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email message, including any attachments, is
> intended only for the recipient(s). If you are not the intended recipient,
> please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy all copies of the
> original message.
>
> > > > >



--
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
voice 512.206.9315 fax: 512.206.9264 http://www.tsbvi.edu/
"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964

From: Karlen Communications
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 2:07PM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

And these resources
http://karlencommunications.com/OfficeForWindowsAccessibility.html

For both creating accessible documents and for students with disabikitiesnwriting assignments/papers.

As well as conference handouts related to accessible WordPDF on the handouts page.

Cheers, Karen

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 22, 2016, at 3:58 PM, Jim Allan < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>
> and there is this -
> Adobe® Acrobat® X Creating Accessible PDF Files from Microsoft® Word
> http://www.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/accessibility/products/acrobat/pdfs/acrobat-x-accessible-pdf-from-word.pdf
>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 2:12 PM, Marinette Fargo < = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = > wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> This is great info from everyone!
>>
>>
>> If any of your students are creating documents on a Mac, please make sure
>> they know that Microsoft Word for the Mac cannot produce a fully accessible
>> PDF. A PDF made from Microsoft Word for the Mac does not retain the
>> structure tags (headings, lists, table headers, etc.) from the original
>> document, so it is difficult for a screen reader user to navigate.
>>
>>
>>
>> A few alternative options for Mac users are:
>>
>>
>>
>> Create your Word document with MS Word for the Mac. Save your document on
>> a thumb drive (or email it to yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows
>> computer open your documents with MS Word and convert them to a PDF. Make
>> sure to follow the instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS
>> Office for Windows.
>>
>>
>>
>> Download LibreOffice which is a free, open-source office suite similar to
>> MS Office. LibreOffice is probably being used by some of your students
>> because it's free! It can open MS Word documents and can save documents as
>> MS Word documents. And it can create accessible PDFs!
>>
>>
>>
>> Create your word document with iWork's Pages software, export or save it
>> as a .doc file. Save your document on a thumb drive (or email it to
>> yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows computer open your documents
>> with MS Word and convert them to a PDF. Make sure to follow the
>> instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS Office for Windows.
>>
>>
>>
>> I hope this helps some!
>>
>> Marinette
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>> To: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 2:00:01 PM
>> Subject: WebAIM-Forum Digest, Vol 131, Issue 22
>>
>> Send WebAIM-Forum mailing list submissions to
>> = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
>>
>> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>> http://list.webaim.org/mailman/listinfo/webaim-forum
>> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>> we

From: Terzian, Sharon
Date: Mon, Feb 22 2016 2:40PM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
← Previous message | Next message →

Hi

Though in my classroom, I have students with Macs, the class is taught as PC based first because that's what's in my lab and also because of many other issues (from templates and menus not even in the same places!) and there are hundreds of PC computers on campus, so they have
access to them, this is good to know for the colleague training that I was asking about though. We will be in the PC lab but I know a few that use MacBooks.


thank you all so much again for all the great info!


Sharon Terzian
Webmistress/Sherlock Center @ RIC
Adjunct Professor/School of Management @ RIC
http://www.sherlockcenter.org
http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net
From: WebAIM-Forum [ = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ] On Behalf Of Marinette Fargo [ = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED = ]
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 3:12 PM
To: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
Subject: Re: [WebAIM] Word/PDF accessibility guide

This is great info from everyone!


If any of your students are creating documents on a Mac, please make sure they know that Microsoft Word for the Mac cannot produce a fully accessible PDF. A PDF made from Microsoft Word for the Mac does not retain the structure tags (headings, lists, table headers, etc.) from the original document, so it is difficult for a screen reader user to navigate.



A few alternative options for Mac users are:



Create your Word document with MS Word for the Mac. Save your document on a thumb drive (or email it to yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows computer open your documents with MS Word and convert them to a PDF. Make sure to follow the instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS Office for Windows.



Download LibreOffice which is a free, open-source office suite similar to MS Office. LibreOffice is probably being used by some of your students because it's free! It can open MS Word documents and can save documents as MS Word documents. And it can create accessible PDFs!



Create your word document with iWork's Pages software, export or save it as a .doc file. Save your document on a thumb drive (or email it to yourself). Then from a PC Microsoft Windows computer open your documents with MS Word and convert them to a PDF. Make sure to follow the instructions for creating an accessible PDF with MS Office for Windows.



I hope this helps some!

Marinette
----- Original Message -----

From: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
To: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 2:00:01 PM
Subject: WebAIM-Forum Digest, Vol 131, Issue 22

Send WebAIM-Forum mailing list submissions to
= EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
http://list.webaim.org/mailman/listinfo/webaim-forum
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
= EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

You can reach the person managing the list at
= EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of WebAIM-Forum digest..."

Today's Topics:

1. Word/PDF accessibility guide (Terzian, Sharon)
2. Re: Font Icons in Safari (_mallory)
3. Use of alt text in document tables (Wyant, Jay (MNIT))
4. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (Jonathan Avila)
5. Re: Race, Gender, and Other Categories in Alt Text for
Headshots (Chaals McCathie Nevile)
6. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
7. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Duff Johnson)
8. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Terzian, Sharon)
9. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Andrew Kirkpatrick)
10. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
11. Automated accessibility testing by the blind testers?
(Ramakrishnan Subramanian)
12. Re: Automated accessibility testing by the blind testers?
(Birkir R. Gunnarsson)
13. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
(Sailesh Panchang)
14. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (Jim Allan)
15. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Jim Allan)
16. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Cliff Tyllick)
17. Re: Use of alt text in document tables (L Snider)
18. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
(Jonathan Avila)
19. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (L Snider)
20. Re: using "label for=" on things other than inputs
(Jonathan Avila)
21. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Cliff Tyllick)
22. Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide (Ryan E. Benson)

--
Library Accessibility Services ,
McLaughlin Library - Room 124
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario
N1G 2W1
Canada
Phone: 519-824-4120 ext. 58925
Fax: 519-836-0435
Office Hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm (Monday - Friday)

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From: Wyant, Jay (MNIT)
Date: Tue, Feb 23 2016 10:16AM
Subject: Re: Word/PDF accessibility guide
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We have printable PDF "quick cards" for all the main MS Office products. Check out our "Electronic Documents" page: http://mn.gov/mnit/programs/accessibility/electronic-documents.jsp. For example, under "Word Documents," you'll see a link for "Printable quick card checklist for accessible word documents (PDF)."

Feedback welcomed!

Jay
-----------------
Jay Wyant
Chief Information Accessibility Officer
MN.IT Services
State of Minnesota
e: = EMAIL ADDRESS REMOVED =
text: 612.825.8285
http://mn.gov/mnit/programs/accessibility/


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